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Antonio Street war heroes honoured 100 years after end of WW1

Nineteen soldiers who never returned home to a single Sefton street from World War One have been honoured with a special commemorative stone, one hundred years after the conflict ended.

The Mayor of Sefton has today (Wednesday, December 12) officially unveiled the permanent tribute on Antonio Street, Bootle, to honour those residents who fought and died during the 1914-1918 war.

Throughout the geographical area now known as Sefton, nearly 4,000 men and women perished in World War One, but the impact of the conflict was perhaps felt strongest in the small terraced row of houses of Antonio Street, where it is often claimed every household lost somebody close to them as a result of the war.

Brothers John & Frederick Palethorpe of Antonio Street, Bootle, were killed in action during World War One

The tribute was commissioned as part of Sefton Council’s ongoing commemorations to mark the Centenary of the end of World War One and the Local Authority’s emotional Beyond The War Memorials project.

Sefton’s Mayor, Cllr Dave Robinson, said: “We wanted to make sure Antonio Street has a permanent and lasting memorial to honour the incredible sacrifice those nineteen men made for their families, their neighbours and their country.

“There are so many heart wrenching stories from behind the doors of this street. At number Four, a couple lost two sons.

“Their first son, John George, was just 30 years of age and married with two small children, when he was killed at Ypres. His younger brother Frederick was in the navy. He sadly died age 22, when his ship HMS Laurentic struck a mine off Ireland in January 1917.

“Two family members were also lost at number 19, when cousins Joseph Sloey and Joseph Kane were both killed.

“To be able to permanently honour these brave men, on the street they grew up on, is incredibly important and I hope that many future generations of Antonio Street residents pause to learn of the great sacrifices that were made.”

As part of Sefton Council’s Beyond The War Memorial campaign, 2,000 households in Sefton have received special information packs in the post, which include the details of those who lived at that address and died in action.

For more information about Antonio Street and to read more about the Beyond The War Memorials project, visit www.seftonwarmemorials.org.

New Sefton base for Police Community Support Officers

A team of Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) from Merseyside Police has moved in to a new base at Magdalen House as part of Sefton Council’s move to locality-based working.

PCSOs Emma Cooke, Anthony Holden and Helen Holt will work from the ground floor of Magdalen House alongside a range of council services focusing on early intervention and prevention.

Magdalen House PCSOs Emma Cook Anthony Holden and Helen Holt

This way of working will allow the council and its partners to share information, resources and data more collaboratively. The PCSO team will also be able to work from agile suites at Netherton Activity Centre and Southport Town Hall.

Formerly based at Marsh Lane Police Station in Bootle, the PCSO’s relocation to Magdalen will see them collaborate with colleagues across the council to help children, families and vulnerable adults in Sefton tackle problems at an early stage.

Their immediate focus will be to identify people who regularly contact Sefton Council and Merseyside Police for help.

Emma Cooke, who has served as a PCSO for 10 years, says the team are already seeing the benefits of working at Magdalen House after moving in eight weeks’ ago.

PCSO Cooke said: “It’s great to be part of a big team and be able to share information immediately with partners. The aim of the Early Help plan is to work together to help our communities become more resilient, and having a base at Sefton Council means we take a more joined-up approach.

“Everyone at Sefton has been really welcoming and we are looking forward to getting to know everyone in the different teams.”

PCSO Helen Holt said the move will help all partners focus on the needs of local partners and communities more cohesively. She said: “Working together will help us identify areas of demand and allow us to share that information quickly with teams at Sefton Council.

“We’ll be able to cooperate and offer a service that is structured, focussed and tailored to the needs of the community.”

Anthony Holden, who has served as a PCSO for three years, says he is enjoying being in the new environment and is looking forward to closer partnership working. He said: “We already feel at home in Magdalen and it’s great to working with colleagues at Sefton as part of a ‘one-team’ approach.

“We hope our work will help reduce demand and allow us all to work smarter together for the benefit of individuals and families across Sefton.”

Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Communities and Housing, said:” This move will really help us work as one team with partner agencies, to share resources and information to make us more resilient and effective.

“Having the PCSOs in Magdalen House means we can easily work together to help vulnerable people across Sefton, getting them help at an early stage to prevent their problems from escalating and ensuring they are well supported.”

Volunteers brave the cold to explore Sefton’s Sand Dunes

Wintry showers didn’t put off a team of green fingered volunteers, as they explored Sefton’s sand dunes last week.

 The Gems in The Dunes, series of talks and walks, ran a training day all about Bryophytes, the smallest plants on the borough’s coast.

The session took place at Ainsdale Discovery Centre on Thursday November 1.

 Green Sefton’s Land Management Unit Apprentices, also went along as an early part of their training. They are spending the next 2 years with Sefton Council, working towards an NVQ II in Horticulture, through Myerscough College.

 In the morning attendees learnt the theory behind Bryophyte conservation and were given training on how to survey Bryophytes including Bryums and Petalworts. The day also included lessons on identification, life cycle and habitat requirements.

 Afterwards the group donned their warm waterproofs and took a field trip to Birkdale to see the plants in their natural habitat.

 For more information about future training call 01704 571 575 or email gems-in-the-dunes@arc-trust.org.

Ramada celebrates ten years in Southport

The award-winning Ramada Hotel in Southport is celebrating its 10th Birthday.

Officially opened on October 23, 2008, the now iconic staple of Southport’s promenade scene, the 4-star Ramada hotel has welcomed thousands of people through its doors over the last decade.

Lisa Little, General Manager said: “We are delighted to be celebrating such a milestone birthday. We feel that our strength has been the partnerships we have made and ingratiating the business into the town and its offer.

“We work with other businesses, organisations and Sefton Council to attract people into the town and offer the very best customer experience once they visit us.

“We are undergoing huge change here, moving into becoming the Waterfront national leisure destination alongside the Southport Theatre, Floral Hall Ballroom and we look forward to the next ten years!”

In January it will undergo a rebrand becoming the first Bliss Hotel in the UK. 

Adopters needed across Merseyside

The regional adoption agency for Merseyside is highlighting the need for more people to provide homes for children.

As National Adoption Week gets underway on Monday October 15, Adoption in Merseyside (AiM) – which recruits for local authorities in Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton and Wirral – is urging people to think about providing a loving, stable home for Merseyside’s children.

Adopted children are unable to live with their birth families for many reasons and move to live permanently with a new family, taking their surname and assuming the same rights and privileges as if they had been born to them.

Children who need adoptive families often need a little extra from their new parents, and over the next year AiM is looking to recruit over 80 sets of adopters.

Jenny Ness, Head of Service for AiM, said: “Becoming an adopter is life changing, for everyone involved and is the single most important thing that will ever happen to a young person as it completely transforms their life chances.

“For the adopter, there truly is nothing more rewarding or fulfilling.  Although the process of becoming an adopter has to be extremely thorough, we try and make it as pain free as possible.

“I would urge anyone who has ever thought about adoption to get in touch with us – it could be the best decision you ever make.”

You will need to have a child-friendly lifestyle, provide a stable environment and be ready for the challenge and lifelong commitment of adoption. You will also need time, patience, love and resilience to help a child reach their full potential.

Adoptive parents from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed as it helps to be able to match them with children who have very varied needs.

Applications are open to people from all backgrounds regardless of age, race, religion, ethnicity, gender or sexuality.  Couples, single people, disabled people and people from all cultures are welcome.

AiM are particularly looking for parents who can offer a home to children of all ages who:

  • Are part of a sibling group
  • Are disabled or have a medical condition
  • Have complex needs
  • Are from different ethnic or cultural backgrounds

You must be:

  • Over 21 and mature enough to meet the demands of parenthood
  • Fit and well enough to care for children until they are adults
  • Able to offer a secure home with a spare room for one or more children

A drop in adoption information evening is being held on Tuesday 30 October from 4-7pm in Garston. Please contact AiM directly on 0151 477 8700 for further details

For more information about adoption, log on to www.adoptioninmerseyside.co.uk or call 0151 477 8700.

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