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Guide produced to help young people with special educational needs get ready for adulthood

A guide to help young people with special educational needs (SEND) get ready for adulthood has been published following feedback from young people, parents and carers across Sefton.

The ‘Preparing for Adulthood Guide’ was produced by staff from Sefton Council, Buddy Up and Sefton Carers Centre in partnership with young people and the Sefton Parent Carer Forum.

Aimed at young people with SEND who are approaching their latter school years, it gives information on the preparing-for-adulthood process, what to expect, what they should be considering at each stage and who to contact for support and information.

Parents and carers can also use the guide to find more information about the future options for young people in their care.

Topics covered in the guide include further education, training and employment, independent living, healthy lifestyle choices and how to participate in our communities.

The new guide has been developed following feedback from young people, parents and carers across Sefton.

Tanya Wilcock, Head of Communities for Sefton Council, said: “This guide has been co-produced and co-designed with young people and their families and will be a valuable resource for them.

“I’d like to thank our partners across the social care, voluntary, education and health sectors for their contributions. Thanks also to the team for coordinating and supporting all the work that went into its production.”

Andrew Jennings, from Sefton Council’s Special Educational Needs and Inclusion Team, said: “This guide has been produced to help children and young people with SEND enjoy meaningful, independent and fulfilling lives and give them useful information and resources to help them achieve as much as they possibly can.

“We’re really proud of it and we hope that children and young people across Sefton find it helpful as they transition in to adulthood.”

The guide can be accessed and downloaded at Sefton’s Local Offer website . It will also be made available to schools and colleges.

Stephen Evans, Preparing for Adulthood Manager for Sefton Council’s Special Educational Needs (SEN) and Inclusion Service, said: “The Sefton ‘Preparing for Adulthood (PfA) Guide’ provides key information on the four key PfA themes – Community, Health, Independent Living and Employment.

“Developed in conjunction with Sefton Parent Carer Forum, the guide will help young people and their families prepare for the transition to adulthood.

“It gives information on the preparing-for-adulthood process, what to expect, what young people should be considering at each stage and who to contact for support and information.”

Emma Lambert, Sefton CVS Buddy Up Coordinator, said: “Sefton’s ‘Preparing for Adulthood Guide’ is a useful tool to help young people and their families think about what they want their future to look like and find out what support is available to get them there.

“Having the right Information and being made aware of their options is the key to these young people reaching their full potential.”

 

Autumn edition of Aiming High for Disabled Children newsletter out now

The Autumn 2020 edition of Sefton Council’s Aiming High for Disabled Children newsletter is out now and available for you to read.

Aiming High for Disabled Children is a service provided by Sefton Council to make sure disabled children, young people and their families have the same access to fun, fulfilling activities and life chances as those without disabilities.

It provides specially tailored sessions during term-time and holidays that young people can access, and specialist support when young people reach key transition points, such as moving from education in to employment.

Aiming High’s newsletter is produced three times a year and contains good news stories about things that are happening within the service. This includes blogs from young people and service users, a closer look in to some of the activities, groups and events available for young people in Sefton and up-to-date information about local and national guidance and support for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND).

You can read the Aiming High Newsletter by clicking here. This autumn 2020 edition focuses on the positive outreach work our Aiming High team and partner agencies have undertaken throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and there’s also plenty of inspirational stories of achievement and success from young people across the borough.

Find out more about Aiming High for Disabled Children at Sefton Council’s website here. Use the links on this page to discover Aiming High’s Short Breaks activities, family support for SEND, and transitions services for young people age 13-25 SEND.

You can also register with Sefton’s Disabled Children’s Database at The Sefton Directory to keep up-to-date with services that are useful to you. Once registered you are also guaranteed a regular copy of the Aiming High for Disabled Children newsletter.

Sefton Council joins forces with partners to tackle Hate Crime

National Hate Crime Awareness Week takes place from 10th – 17th October 2020. The aim of the week is to raise awareness of what hate crime is and how it affects people, encourage people to report hate crime, and let people know what is happening in the local area to tackle hate crime.

Raising awareness and encouraging the reporting of hate crimes and incidents is a priority for the Council and partners throughout the year, but we can also take the opportunity to join with national groups across the country to highlight issues during campaign weeks.

What is Hate Crime?

A hate crime is defined as ‘Any criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a person’s race or perceived race; religion or perceived religion; sexual orientation or perceived sexual orientation; disability or perceived disability and any crime motivated by hostility or prejudice against a person who is transgender or perceived to be transgender.’

A hate incident is any incident which the victim, or anyone else, thinks is based on someone’s prejudice towards them because of their race, religion, sexual orientation, disability or because they are transgender.

Not all hate incidents will amount to criminal offences, but it is equally important that these are reported and recorded by the police

Cllr Ian Maher Leader of Sefton Council said:

“Sefton Council take all incidents of Hate Crime very seriously and we are working hard with our partner agencies to tackle this problem.

 “I would encourage people to tell and partner agencies such as the Police, support charities such as Stop Hate UK and housing providers who can help take action and support victims and witnesses.

“You don’t have to be the victim to be able to report a hate crime or hate incident, anyone can make a report a crime. Please help us make Sefton a safer place for everyone.”

Click here for more information about hate crime from the Sefton Council website.

Click here for more information from Merseyside Police, including an online reporting.

Click here for more information about National Hate Crime Awareness Week.

Click here for more information about the Stop Hate UK national hate crime helpline.

Young people in Sefton tell decision makers about their lives during COVID-19

Young people from Sefton came together with key decision makers in the first ever virtual SYMBOL meeting which involved 50 participants.

Being a member of SYMBOL (Sefton Youth Making Better Opportunities with Leaders) means a young person plays an active role in their community, with a direct line of communication with leaders such as councillors and senior managers at Sefton Council, and also with partners including representatives from Public Health.

At the meeting young people talked about their experiences and some of the issues that they faced during the Coronavirus pandemic. This included feelings of isolation, worries about falling back on school work, being able to adapt when returning to school and concerns about family members and how the pandemic is affecting relatives.

As part of the discussions participants also took part in a survey which gave an overall view of how the group had been coping during the lockdown, what positives could be taken out of the experience and what support is needed.

Jo Lee, Sefton Young Advisors Team Lead and SYMBOL Coordinator said;

 “Although lockdown restrictions meant joining in person was not possible, it was still so important, now more than ever that the meeting went ahead in order to understand what impact the Coronavirus pandemic is having on young people and to listen to their views about how it is affecting their lives.

“With a survey telling us that 75% of the young people in our meeting alone, feel that COVID has had a negative impact on their mental health, it is important that we listen to the challenges they are facing, so we have a better understanding of how we can support them.

“It’s also really encouraging to listen to the positives young people are taking from this experience including improvements to the environment and learning new hobbies”

If you or anyone you know would like any support or advice during this time, please visit our website where there is guidance for children and young people on how to maintain good health and wellbeing.

LCR Pride Foundation invites Merseyside to MarchOnline

The MarchOnline will take place on Saturday 25th July and forms part of the organisation’s digital ‘Young at Heart’ programme, which is supported by Barclays.

LCR Pride Foundation, the organisation responsible for delivering Pride in Liverpool and the annual March with Pride, has today opened registrations for a virtual march, on what would have been day of the city region’s Pride celebrations.

Instead of taking to the streets of the city, the organisation is this year inviting individuals, groups and businesses to join a ‘MarchOnline’, allowing the LGBT+ community and its allies to safely come together to march in solidarity, celebration and in protest against the prejudice and inequalities that the LGBT+ community continues to face, in the UK and across the globe.

The virtual march will comprise videos of individuals marching, cheering and holding placards in their own homes, submitted by the members of the public, charities and businesses supporting the LGBT+ community.

The videos will then be broadcast from the organisation’s social channels, at 12 noon on Saturday 25th July, when the physical march had been set to take place.

Last year saw Liverpool’s biggest ever March with Pride, with a record 12,000 coming together for the annual event. However, both 2020’s March with Pride and Pride in Liverpool were postponed in April, in response to public health concerns raised by the ongoing global pandemic.

Speaking of the MarchONline, LCR Pride Foundation Interim CEO, Andi Herring, said: “It has never been more important for us to find a way to come together as a community, feel connected and March with Pride. MarchOnline provides us with a safe way to do that from our homes and mark who would have been the weekend of Pride in Liverpool.

“We’re looking forward to seeing the diversity and creativity of the Liverpool City Region’s LGBT+ community, its supporters and allies shining through in our virtual march. Even despite a global pandemic, we will march on!”

Individuals wishing to take part in the virtual march are asked to register and submit a landscape-orientation photo or 20-second video while waving, cheering, marching, dancing, posing with a partner, family or pet, or even displaying a banner.

Organisations wishing to ‘march’ as a group will also be given the opportunity to provide a 10 – 20 second video from a designated spokesperson, introducing the organisation, why it is marching and sharing what Pride means to them.

Andrew Websdale, Regional Head of Barclays Spectrum, Barclays LGBT+ colleague network said: “Pride is more than a march, it’s about coming together as a community in celebration, unity and solidarity. Pride is still needed, more so than ever for some. So although we can’t celebrate in the same way in Liverpool this year, we are delighted to support the Young at Heart 2020 Digital Programme, including the MarchOnline event.”

The deadline for registration and submission of images and videos is midnight on Monday, July 6.

Full details of how to submit your video can be found at lcrpride.co.uk/march

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