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Young people in Sefton tell decision makers about their lives during COVID-19

Young people from Sefton came together with key decision makers in the first ever virtual SYMBOL meeting which involved 50 participants.

Being a member of SYMBOL (Sefton Youth Making Better Opportunities with Leaders) means a young person plays an active role in their community, with a direct line of communication with leaders such as councillors and senior managers at Sefton Council, and also with partners including representatives from Public Health.

At the meeting young people talked about their experiences and some of the issues that they faced during the Coronavirus pandemic. This included feelings of isolation, worries about falling back on school work, being able to adapt when returning to school and concerns about family members and how the pandemic is affecting relatives.

As part of the discussions participants also took part in a survey which gave an overall view of how the group had been coping during the lockdown, what positives could be taken out of the experience and what support is needed.

Jo Lee, Sefton Young Advisors Team Lead and SYMBOL Coordinator said;

 “Although lockdown restrictions meant joining in person was not possible, it was still so important, now more than ever that the meeting went ahead in order to understand what impact the Coronavirus pandemic is having on young people and to listen to their views about how it is affecting their lives.

“With a survey telling us that 75% of the young people in our meeting alone, feel that COVID has had a negative impact on their mental health, it is important that we listen to the challenges they are facing, so we have a better understanding of how we can support them.

“It’s also really encouraging to listen to the positives young people are taking from this experience including improvements to the environment and learning new hobbies”

If you or anyone you know would like any support or advice during this time, please visit our website where there is guidance for children and young people on how to maintain good health and wellbeing.

LCR Pride Foundation invites Merseyside to MarchOnline

The MarchOnline will take place on Saturday 25th July and forms part of the organisation’s digital ‘Young at Heart’ programme, which is supported by Barclays.

LCR Pride Foundation, the organisation responsible for delivering Pride in Liverpool and the annual March with Pride, has today opened registrations for a virtual march, on what would have been day of the city region’s Pride celebrations.

Instead of taking to the streets of the city, the organisation is this year inviting individuals, groups and businesses to join a ‘MarchOnline’, allowing the LGBT+ community and its allies to safely come together to march in solidarity, celebration and in protest against the prejudice and inequalities that the LGBT+ community continues to face, in the UK and across the globe.

The virtual march will comprise videos of individuals marching, cheering and holding placards in their own homes, submitted by the members of the public, charities and businesses supporting the LGBT+ community.

The videos will then be broadcast from the organisation’s social channels, at 12 noon on Saturday 25th July, when the physical march had been set to take place.

Last year saw Liverpool’s biggest ever March with Pride, with a record 12,000 coming together for the annual event. However, both 2020’s March with Pride and Pride in Liverpool were postponed in April, in response to public health concerns raised by the ongoing global pandemic.

Speaking of the MarchONline, LCR Pride Foundation Interim CEO, Andi Herring, said: “It has never been more important for us to find a way to come together as a community, feel connected and March with Pride. MarchOnline provides us with a safe way to do that from our homes and mark who would have been the weekend of Pride in Liverpool.

“We’re looking forward to seeing the diversity and creativity of the Liverpool City Region’s LGBT+ community, its supporters and allies shining through in our virtual march. Even despite a global pandemic, we will march on!”

Individuals wishing to take part in the virtual march are asked to register and submit a landscape-orientation photo or 20-second video while waving, cheering, marching, dancing, posing with a partner, family or pet, or even displaying a banner.

Organisations wishing to ‘march’ as a group will also be given the opportunity to provide a 10 – 20 second video from a designated spokesperson, introducing the organisation, why it is marching and sharing what Pride means to them.

Andrew Websdale, Regional Head of Barclays Spectrum, Barclays LGBT+ colleague network said: “Pride is more than a march, it’s about coming together as a community in celebration, unity and solidarity. Pride is still needed, more so than ever for some. So although we can’t celebrate in the same way in Liverpool this year, we are delighted to support the Young at Heart 2020 Digital Programme, including the MarchOnline event.”

The deadline for registration and submission of images and videos is midnight on Monday, July 6.

Full details of how to submit your video can be found at lcrpride.co.uk/march

A popular historic building in Crosby is set to be brought back into community use.

Sefton Council recognises the importance of the Grade II listed Carnegie Library building and late last year advertised it to try and identify the right opportunity that benefits the community and local residents.

The competitive process looking at bids for the future of this important asset has been completed and options around next steps are now being considered.

A report highlighting the potential use of the College Road building as a sustainable business hub with an emphasis on social value has been approved by Cllr Paulette Lappin, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member Regulatory, Compliance and Corporate Services.

Cunard Construction Limited will facilitate the repair and refurbishment of the Library in line with its status as a Grade II listed building.

 Cllr Paulette Lappin, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member Regulatory, Compliance and Corporate Services, said:

“Carnegie Library is a valued asset for both the Council and the local community and its heritage status is widely recognised.

“The successful business plan submitted for the premises reports on the development and operation of a create a flexible business hub for start-up and smaller businesses, a community café in the centre of the building within the heart of Crosby.

“This is exciting news for Crosby and the wider borough as we bring a much-loved building back into use serving our valued communities. Further details will be released in due course.”

James Flannery, Construction Director at Cunard Construction, said;

“We are delighted to be chosen as the preferred bidder for the iconic and much-loved Carnegie Library in Crosby. We as a business have a track record of refurbishing historic buildings across the Liverpool City Region and the North West.

“We aim to work in partnership with Sefton Council, and the immediate community in Crosby, to create a stimulating business hub, focusing on start-up and smaller businesses who want to work more locally to where they live rather than the more costly city centre office environments. We also have plans to work with other partners, including the Combined Authority, on this and other exciting schemes in the future.

“We as a business will be operating from the new space as we want to demonstrate the transition from start-up, to a more established business operations and the building will be designed to allow this growth.

“We feel the integration of a central bistro / café to compliment the flexible office working environment will enhance a new way of working post Covid-19. Furthermore, we will aim to extending the welcome to this unique building to the local community with internal and external seating space”.

Home food facts on World Food Safety Day (June 7)

In the current circumstances more of us are cooking and eating at home, this World Food Safety Day (June 7) we want to help you make the most of the contents of your cupboards and fridges in a safe way.

The Food Standards Agency have lots of information which will help answer some of the safety questions you may have.

Peter Quigley, Head of Chemical Safety Policy at the Food Standards Agency, said:

“Food safety is everyone’s business. As part of my role, I answer all sorts of questions about food safety, so we’ve pulled together some of the ones we get asked most frequently.

“We hope that our home food facts, help you to avoid throwing away good food unnecessarily.”

Here are five of your top food safety questions answered, to help you make your food go further:

When eggs float are they bad?

Don’t use the egg float test to determine safety. Eggs are safe to eat for a couple of days after the best before date, as long as they are cooked thoroughly.

Is food safe if the can has a dent in it?

If the dent on the can is shallow and there are no other obvious signs that the can is damaged (such as the can expanding or leaking) your food should remain fit to eat.

How long can you safely eat rice for after cooking?

Keep rice in the fridge for no more than one day. When you reheat rice always check the dish is steaming hot all the way through.

Can you eat potatoes when they start to sprout?

Remove any sprouts on potatoes before using them and remember and cut off any green or rotten bits.

Can you eat brown bananas?

Fruit or vegetables that are a bit overripe, such as wrinkly carrots, brown bananas and slightly mushy strawberries can be eaten normally (providing they are not mouldy). Alternatively, they can be used in cooking, baking or smoothies.

For more information, please visit our home food hygiene page.

 

Bootle Town Hall and Crosby Library to be illuminated tonight to support equality and diversity across the world.

Responding to events that have taken place across the United States over the past week, Sefton Council will be illuminating Bootle Town Hall and Crosby Library tonight.

The Council has also re-stated its determination to stand together when anyone faces racism, discrimination, bigotry or oppression.

Cllr Ian Maher, Leader of Sefton Council said;

 “The Council has a proud history of supporting equality and diversity across our beautiful Borough and beyond and remains committed to providing and supporting an environment and communities where all our people are valued for who they are at all times.

“Current events are striking a chord with many of us across Sefton, Merseyside, the UK and the world and illuminating Bootle Town Hall and Crosby Library tonight is to mark that resonance.”

Sefton Council’s commitment to diversity has been acknowledged in a number of ways including receipt of the Navajo Merseyside and Cheshire LGBTIQ Chartermark Certificate, shortlisting for a national award for its work with people who are learning disabled and an award in 2016 for work to combat child sexual exploitation.

Sefton Council is also part of the Department for Work and Pensions’ national Disability Confident Employer scheme.

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