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Alleyway flytipping is becoming a ‘Riddock-ulous’ health risk

Residents and businesses who continue to fly-tip despite constant warnings are putting their own health at serious risk.

That is the message from Sefton Council’s Public Protection team following a recent investigation of gated alleyways in South Sefton, which have been filled with flytipped rubbish.

 Teams from Sefton Council’s Cleansing unit recently joined officers from Public Protection, along with ward councillors on Riddock Road, Litherland to assess the growing issue.

Evidence from the investigation has now been viewed and action will be taken against those who have been found to have dumped rubbish illegally in the area. 

Each year Sefton’s cleansing teams have to remove thousands of tonnes of rubbish from alleyways across the borough, costing the Council more than £800,000 a year to clear up and dispose of.

On average 20 tonnes of flytipped rubbish is left in rear alleyways and passageways each week, running up bills of £2,600 in disposal costs alone.

Cllr Paulette Lappin, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Regulation and Compliance, said: “We know that this rubbish is being dumped illegally by residents and businesses in the immediate vicinity but they do not realise how damaging this is to their own health.

“Riddock Road is just one of hundreds of gated alleyways across South Sefton where flytipping is a real issue. 

“Not only is it incredibly costly to clean up, it can cause serious health issues and directly affect both the culprits and those innocent residents who live nearby. 

“No matter if its a small bin bag or a huge pile of household waste, it’s still flytipping and you will be fined heavily for irresponsibly disposing of your rubbish.

“Flytipping carries a £400 fixed penalty notice and failure to pay will land you in court. We won’t hesitate to issue a fine if we catch people doing it.”

If any residents have any concerns regarding flytipping or wish to report an offence, they should contact us on 0345 140 0845 or report it via our website www.sefton.gov.uk.

Sefton’s homelessness work praised by Local Government Association

Ongoing partnership work to help meet the health needs of people experiencing homelessness and rough sleeping in Sefton has been highlighted as best practice by the Local Government Association (LGA).

The LGA has used the excellent partnership work between Sefton Council, Public Health and Light For Life as a case study on how partners can help tackle health problems associated with homelessness.

While Sefton Council commissions the voluntary sector group, Light for Life, to provide a range of services for homeless people, many of this group were identified to have substance addictions as well.

The Council’s public health and housing support teams decided the solution lay in doing some integrated outreach work and as a result secured some short-term funding from the Government’s Rough Sleepers Initiative to pay for a clinical nurse prescriber.

This allowed them to get a Mersey Care nurse to work directly with the Light for Life outreach service. The nurse started accompanying the homeless service on its rounds in Southport town centre in early 2019 with some positive results.

homeless

Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Communities and Housing, said: “It’s really rewarding to see the excellent partnership work taking place across the borough to tackle some of the health issues associated with homelessness being recognised by the LGA.

“Through this set up, the nurse carries out assessments, books the clients in for appointments and has even been able to hand out anti-overdose drug treatment.

“While this scheme is still in it’s infancy, we have been able to secure more funding so it will continue for another year. It could also be rolled out on a regional basis as an example of best practice as we continue to help some of the most vulnerable people in our communities.”

Greta Fenney, Chief Executive of Light for Life, added: “Having collected relevant data over a long period of time our service has worked hard to achieve results and the key to success has been partnership working.

“With a developing hospital in-reach service we expect further improved outcomes for this vulnerable group.”

To read the full case study, visit: https://local.gov.uk/sefton-outreach-drug-and-alcohol-support-rough-sleepers

Exciting proposals revealed for transformation of Southport Market

Exciting new plans are being developed to potentially transform Southport Market into a unique food and drink offer with flexible events and market space.

Impressive images have just been released charting how the King Street market could look like in the future.

While no final decisions have yet been made, Sefton Council is starting the process by talking to current stall holders about the exciting plans with the view of moving things forward through the usual formal process.

Sefton remains totally committed to ensuring Southport Market continues to operate and makes a positive contribution to the local economy as well as becoming a key visitor destination.

For this to happen, the Council believes the current operating model needs to be adapted to meet changing consumer and businesses demands, and are looking at options on how to build on the previous investment that will potentially deliver:

• Enhanced hot food and drink offer
• Self-contained food retail units
• Flexible market and events space

Cllr Marion Atkinson, Sefton Council’s Labour Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Skills, said: “We really value Southport Market but sadly it has become evident that many factors are making trading conditions extremely difficult and occupancy levels continue to fall.

“While we have been actively promoting it and trying to secure new traders along with other initiatives to help deliver a long term sustainable future for the market, this has sadly not worked.

“As a result and building on our former investment at the market, new plans are being developed to potentially transform the building into a unique offer that will only benefit the town and the wider borough.

“Nothing is set in stone and as we develop further plans over the coming weeks and months we will ensure existing traders are fully kept up to date and consulted on any final plans.

“While we totally understand how trading conditions have been difficult in the market for many months, we remain committed to supporting traders throughout this exciting process and will continue to do so.”

Blackhurst’s butchers have been in the market for 40 years.

Owner, Tony Blackhurst, said: “Having seen the market change over a number of years I am really excited to see the latest plans and look forward to Blackhurst’s butchers playing a key role in the market’s transformation. Blackhurt’s butchers along with the other market traders remain open and we look forward to seeing you soon.”

Anyone who may have an interest in the market’s exciting future plans, please contact tourism@sefton.gov.uk

Sefton invests £320k to keep borough’s communities safe from crime

Sefton Council continues to help keep communities across the borough safe from crime and anti-social behaviour, a recent report has revealed.

Throughout the past twelve months, Sefton’s Safer Communities Partnership (SSCP) have invested in a number of initiatives, programmes and activities designed to disrupt and prevent disorder.

Key targets for the SSCP include:

Investing in community infrastructure projects
Working with victims
Combating domestic and sexual abuse
Tackling serious and organised crime
Improving youth offending services

Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Communities and Housing, said: “In the last financial year we have spent over £320,000 on helping to reduce crime, supporting victims and working with partners to provide resilience to our wonderful communities.

“Through the SSCP we identify a number of areas where there is a need for a project, scheme or event which can often deter crime and anti-social behaviour as well as provide a platform of education.

“The impact that the SSCP have had, from our park night sessions to our scrambler bike partnership work with Merseyside Police, has been incredible and we are constantly receiving positive feedback from our initiatives.

“We are committed to tackling anti-social behaviour in Sefton along with partners in the Sefton Safer and Stronger Communities Partnership (SSCP), and this is shown we’ve seen an incredible reduction in anti-social behaviour incidents since we started our invaluable work.

“We will continue to build a positive future for our thriving communities and work tirelessly to combat any crime and anti-social behaviour in Sefton.”

For more details on the Sefton Safer Communities Partnership, or to read the latest report, visit www.sefton.gov.uk

Sefton leads the way in protecting Heritage At Risk sites

Sefton Council is leading the way in protecting the borough’s most culturally and historically important sites for generations to come.

Working closely with English Heritage and other partners, the local authority has created a proactive and contemporary approach to taking care of Sefton’s Heritage At Risk sites.

This approach led to the creation of a dedicated Sefton Heritage At Risk Officer and, although originally planned as only a temporary position, approval has now been received to make it a permanent fixture of the local authority.

Stuart Barnes, Sefton Council’s Head of Economic Growth and Housing, oversaw the creation of the role and outlined the authority’s ambitions to better manage the borough’s incredible heritage sites.

Stuart said: “We really stepped outside the ‘planning box’ in our bid to protect our Heritage At Risk sites.

“Firstly we had to address what could be done to keep our assets from the ‘At Risk’ register. What were the root causes and could potential problems be headed off before sites became at risk?

“We know heritage assets are important to our communities, providing a historical context to neighbourhoods and townscapes.

“But due to increasing pressures on resources it was necessary to look at different ways of tackling risk, which is why we created the Heritage At Risk officer’s position.

“The wide scope of the role allows us to focus on innovative partnership work, improved community understanding and exploring possible future savings and funding streams.

“Our work has been so beneficial that Southport, one of our key heritage sites, was chosen as a pilot project for Historic England’s national ‘Heritage Action Zone’ scheme.

“This led to a number of fantastic initiatives including the Southport Development Framework, the Lord Street Verandah Project and community led Heritage Trails.”

“A number of key buildings and spaces within Sefton – listed buildings and other buildings in conservation areas – have been targeted for intervention, investment and re-use.

“This is a complex, large scale and long term project, particularly so with the resources at our disposal, but nevertheless is a key priority for Sefton Council”.

Daniel Longman, Sefton’s dedicated Heritage At Risk Officer, added: “My role is to make sure our heritage sites are at the forefront of any work we do while continuing to encourage community resilience.

“I put a lot of focus into working closely with our communities and partners, using our combined knowledge to identify future projects, potential ‘At Risk’ sites and finding new funding streams.

“We want our communities and visitors to be better informed of the history and character and value of the borough and this has a positive knock-on effect on tourism, the economy and housing.”

Sefton Council is now working alongside partners and community groups in the delivery of the Southport Townscape Heritage Project, with the explicit aim of enhancing the quality and strength of the linkages between the town centre and the seafront.

It will focus on historic properties between Lord Street and the Promenade and aims to complement the previous HLF restoration of King’s Gardens and the recent £2m award from the Coastal Communities funds for the pier.

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