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Beating the heat in Sefton

Person in sunglasses and sunhatNHS and council leaders in Sefton are advising residents to keep cool this summer, by planning ahead and taking precautions to ‘beat the heat’ while enjoying the sunshine.

With warmer weather forecast across the UK, healthcare professionals are reminding everyone to be aware of the risks of hot weather and to take extra care of themselves and others.

Top tips

Their top tips for keeping safe in the sun include:

  • Staying hydrated: drink plenty of fluids and avoid excess alcohol.
  • Physical activity: avoid extreme physical exertion or keep it for cooler parts of the day like early morning or evening.
  • Keep your environment cool: use curtains or blinds to keep your home cool, or find the coolest part of your home, garden or outdoor space to sit in.
  • Travelling: ensure that babies, children, older people or animals are not left in closed, parked vehicles which can quickly overheat.
  • Enjoy the water safely: going for a swim can help you cool down but take care and follow local safety advice if you are going into water.
  • Avoid sunburn: try to keep out of the sun at the hottest part of the day, between 11am and 3pm.
  • Protect yourself: apply sunscreen of at least SPF15 with UVA protection, wear UV sunglasses, a wide-brimmed hat, and loose-fitting clothes.

Keep cool and protect ourselves

Martin McDowell, deputy chief officer at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: ““The advice might sound like common sense, but it’s good to remind ourselves to keep cool and protect ourselves, our family and friends.

“At a time when NHS services are still under pressure, taking precautions to keep ourselves safe in the sun will mean that urgent care services are kept available for those who need them most.

Margaret Jones, Sefton Council’s Director of Public Health said: “Everyone loves to enjoy the great British summer, but it’s important to remember that hot weather can pose health risks for some people.

“Remember to keep an eye on any friends, family or neighbours who may be more vulnerable to the heat, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and very young children.”

During the hot weather, residents are also encouraged to seek medical if they need it by contacting NHS 111 online at 111.nhs.uk  or by calling 111 to help them reach the best NHS service for their need.

To find out about the signs of heat exhaustion and heatstroke and when to get help, visit: NHS Live Well.