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Help Sefton Council to shape its flood and coastal erosion risk strategy for the next decade

Sefton Council, as the Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA), is drawing up a new strategy to protect its communities from the risk of flooding and coastal erosion over the next decade.

The new management strategy will outline the clear roles and responsibilities of not only the Council, but other risk management authorities including the Environment Agency, United Utilities, Highways England and the Canal and River Trust.

It will set out the actions that will be undertaken to reduce the risk and impact of flooding and coastal erosion on Sefton’s communities and highlight simple actions that residents themselves can undertake in support of this.  

Arial view of the coastline at Southport
Arial view of the coastline at Southport

Everyone living in Sefton is encouraged to take part in the period of consultation on the draft strategy, ensuring that their views are heard before the plan is finalised in early 2022.

The public consultation includes the opportunity for the strategy, and associated business plan, to be viewed in full, followed by a short survey to gather thoughts from residents.

People can take part online at www.YourSeftonYourSay.sefton.gov.uk and have up until Wednesday 17th November 2021.

Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing, said:

“We are very proud of our unique borough with its 22 miles of amazing coastline and diverse landscapes among our urban residential areas and business hubs. One thing we have in common with the rest of the country, and especially other coastal authorities, is the risk of flooding and erosion and the complex challenges that we face to manage the impact of such events on our communities.

“That is why it’s vital for us to develop, maintain, apply and monitor a local flood risk management strategy, and to seek the views of those who live here in Sefton as we look to shape that plan for the next decade.”

Flood and erosion events can affect not only those living in high-risk areas, but also transport networks, schools, highways and local businesses. They can also have detrimental environmental impacts on rare habitats and species, which is why the Council is dedicated to producing a management strategy that is fit-for-purpose and recognises the increasing challenges of the climate emergency and where targeted and risk-based investment is needed.

The Council’s own plans must align with the Environment Agency’s national strategy that looks 100 years into the future and considers the risks climate change presents and the options to adapt to this challenge.

Cllr Moncur added:

“Over the past decade due to a combination of severe weather events and instances occurring from rivers, sewers and surface water, we’ve seen significant flooding events in neighbourhoods across Sefton, including most recently at the start of 2021 in Maghull.

“These events can have devastating environmental, social and economic impacts, making a sustainable flood risk management strategy absolutely essential for our communities. And is complementary to our on-going work with partners, such as the recently formed strategic flood resilience group, where we share expertise and identify actions that can be taken individually and collectively to reduce the overall risk.

“I would urge everyone across Sefton to take part as we shape this plan for the next decade to ensure their views are heard.”