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Sensational summer for Coast volunteers

Over the summer we’ve enjoyed spending time on the Sefton Coast with visitors to our dunes, woodlands, beaches and parks.

Over the summer (April – September), the Friends of Sefton Coast have had over 750 volunteer visits, giving more than 1500 hours of time to help clean up beaches, woodlands and parks, and  keeping access routes clear and carrying out wildlife surveys.

We held several Beach Clean Ups over the summer and our volunteers recovered over 550 bags of debris, they then separated the debris into recyclable and non-recyclable materials, this produced almost 100 bags recyclable plastics.

If you were one of the brilliant volunteers who helped out over the summer, we’d love to hear from you and capture your experiences of working along the Sefton coast. We would love to be able to share your feelings and experiences with people living and working in Sefton and hopefully inspire others to help maintain Sefton’s natural beauty and share in its huge capacity to improve health and wellbeing amongst our local communities.

Lifeboat Road and Ravenmeols Local Nature Reserve are now under the management of the National Trust. For the Friends of Sefton Coast who volunteer at these sites, you may still do so, but you might want to discuss your voluntary contributions with the National Trust also. If you are happy for us to forward your contact details to the National Trust, please let us know.

All of our volunteers who have previously gone through the grazing animal’s welfare training will be aware that as winter approaches, the sheep and cattle will be back on the grazing enclosures at Ainsdale and Birkdale Local Nature Reserve. If you can help with welfare checks, please get in touch with us at the Ainsdale office and we will make arrangements with you. If you have not been through the stock animals training, but are still be interested in helping us to monitor the winter grazing animals, then please get in touch because we can arrange to provide you with suitable training.

 

Don’t forget that you can contact the Friends of Sefton Coast group or email Gordon White, Coast & Countryside Officer for Sefton Council – Email: Gordon.white@sefton.gov.uk at any time. Equally, if you know anyone who is interested in visiting, exploring and enjoying the coast, who might like to volunteer, then please ask them to get in touch, everyone is welcome.

Pioneering Egypt collection takes centre stage in new exhibition

From Nefertiti to Amelia Edwards and Mrs Goodison, Egypt has been a place of strong women.

The unique Atkinson exhibition; Adventures in Egypt: Mrs Goodison & Other Travellers tells the fascinating stories of some influential women in the early days of Egyptian archaeology and re-unites ancient masterpieces not seen together for over 120 years.

Celebrating 130 years since her first return from Egypt it combines objects from her own collection with masterpieces from international museums, including The British Museum and The National Portrait Gallery; all help provide a wider context for her life and travels.

Bronze ring inscribed with the name of Seth, Lord of Nubt, Dynasty 18, c1550BC

On display are incredible unseen letters written by Mrs Goodison herself (from the Brooklyn Museum USA), that shed new light on important discoveries and acquisitions in The Atkinson’s own collections and present us with new characters that offer new voices to the stories of the past .

The Atkinson’s 1000-strong Egyptian collection mainly comes from the collection of Anne Goodison, wife of a Merseyside civil engineer and friend of John Ruskin, who learned hieroglyphs and visited Egypt twice in 1886-7 and 1890-1.

Adventures in Egypt is the first exhibition to be dedicated to the histories of travelling to Egypt and collecting Egyptian objects, focusing on the pioneering female travellers and collectors like Mrs Goodison, Amelia Edwards, founder of the Egypt Exploration Society and Annie Barlow, benefactor of Bolton Museum.

Nineteenth century excavators were allowed to keep a proportion of their finds, with the rest staying in Egypt.

Excavators could distribute their finds among friends, colleagues, and funders to raise money, therefore separating objects among different collections. Here, pieces that have been separated in different collections since their discovery have been brought back together.

Star pieces include two heads from the excavations at the Temple of Mut in Luxor, excavated by female archaeologists Margaret Benson and Janet Gourlay; and objects from Tell el-Amarna, the capital of Tutankhamun’s parents Akhenaten and Nefertiti, excavated by Flinders Petrie and the young Howard Carter.

The Atkinson’s most recent acquisition; the Trial piece of Nefertiti, was originally excavated by Howard Carter for Lord Amherst and subsequently sold to The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, before being deaccessioned in the 1950s. It now joins other images of Nefertiti from the same excavations all on display together.

Adventures in Egypt – Mrs Goodison & Other Travellers is on display at The Atkinson until March 10, 2018

Bootle pupils help spruce up Derby Park

Pupils from a Bootle primary school donned their rubber gloves and helped make a local park sparkle during a recent litter-pick.

Children from St Monica’s Primary School joined up with Sefton Council’s Parks and Greenspaces team to help spruce up Derby Park, clearing away as much litter as possible.

More than 60 pupils and their teachers worked throughout the afternoon to amass five full bin bags worth of litter, while the Friends of Derby Park group swept away fallen leaves from the park’s steps.

Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing, said:

“We were delighted that St Monica’s pupils came down to Derby Park to help make it shine.

“The children were shocked that there are people who treat the park with such disrespect by not disposing of their litter in a responsible way.

“At the end of the afternoon you could see the huge difference the pupils had made to the park and it looked so much cleaner afterwards.

“The pupils also got involved in a question and answer session about why it is important to care for the environment and not discard litter irresponsibly.

“We look forward to welcoming them back to Derby Park soon!”

The Friends of Derby Park Group are also on the look out for new members.

If you would like to get involved, please email parks@sefton.gov.uk.

Recycling centres switch to winter hours

Throughout winter Recyling and Refuse Centres will be open from 8.00am until 5.00pm* – changing from the summer hours of 8.00am to 8.00pm.

There are 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres in the region. They are operated by resource management company Veolia on behalf of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA).

In Sefton the centres are: Formby (Altcar Road) Sefton Meadows (Sefton Lane) Southport (Foul Lane ) and Bootle (Irlam Road)

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said:

“We shorten the hours over the winter to coincide with the darker nights over the forthcoming months.

“Merseyside householders can use the Centres to recycle a host of items – from cans, car batteries and cardboard to garden waste, glass bottles and jars, paper, scrap metal, textiles and timber, and much more.”

If you’re planning to visit a Recycling Centre in a van or with a long trailer then you will need a Permit to get in – visit www.merseysidewda.gov.uk or call 0151 236 0305. Alternatively download the Merseyside Recycling app from the App Store or Google Play Store.

Youngsters make waves at anti-scrambler fun day!

Pupils from schools across South Sefton have been shown how to have fun without dangerous scrambler bikes, thanks to Sefton Council and Merseyside Police.

Hundreds of schoolchildren from All Saints, Lander Road, The Grange, English Martyrs and Hatton Hill donned their gym kits and took part in an exhilarating inter-school sports day at Crosby Lakeside recently.

This is the second sports day by Sefton Council and Merseyside Police, designed to highlight the effects scrambler bikes have on local communities and how children can have tons of fun away from the dangerous bikes.

As well as learning about the vehicles, children took part in a host of activities including raft building, bush craft, archery, orienteering, teamwork and problem solving.

Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s cabinet member for Communities and Housing said: “This was a fantastic day out for all involved.

“Around 160 schoolchildren took part in the day and our partnership with Merseyside Police is working extremely well to highlight the dangers associated with scrambler bikes and how they can affect local communities.

“By getting involved in the campaign we hope all the young people have learned some valuable lessons and they have now been rewarded with a great day out using our amazing facilities at Crosby Lakeside.

“Next the schoolchildren will be taking part in a competition where they have been asked to make a 90 second video about the dangers of becoming involved in scrambler bike activity.

“The winners will be announced at a ceremony at Police Headquarters in December.”

Sefton Neighbourhood Inspector Ian Jones said: “Education and engagement is such an important part of the work we do alongside Sefton Council and our other partners. This inter-school sports day is a brilliant way for children to channel their energy and creativity in a positive way.

“During our yearly scrambler bike initiative, we not only want to show young people the serious dangers and nuisance that scrambler bikes cause across the community, but also encourage them to learn different activities, skills and pursuits.

“The enthusiasm we saw from everyone was great, and this autumn term will see them get involved in all sorts of competitions and activities.”

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