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Involving you in the development of health services

Sefton residents are being invited to share their thoughts and ideas on how health commissioners in the borough could better involve them in their local NHS.

There are a number of ways that people can currently find out more about the work of NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS South Sefton CCG or get involved in what they do. This includes taking part in surveys, coming along to their governing body meetings, or directly contacting the CCGs with their queries and questions via email, website, phone or post.

Gill Brown, lay representative for patient and public engagement of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said:

“We greatly value the views of our residents and their feedback helps to shape our work. So it’s important that as many people as possible have the opportunity to give their views when we are asking about health issues that matter to them most.”

Both CCGs hold regular public events, called ‘Big Chats’, where residents are asked for their views and experiences to help shape the health commissioners’ latest work. However, the CCGs understand that different people will prefer different ways to feedback their experiences of local health services, or to get involved in what they do.

Graham Bayliss, lay representative for patient and public engagement of NHS South Sefton CCG, said:

“There is always more we can do to get people involved in our work and new and different ways like social media that we can use to do this. We want to hear from residents about how they would like us to involve them and we’re inviting people to tell us how we can best do this by taking part in our survey.”

Sefton residents are asked to complete a short online survey about the ways they would like the CCGs to update them or involve them in their work. Feedback will help the CCGs to look at new and different ways to involve and inform their residents in the future.

Anyone with an interest in local health is invited to take part in the questionnaire, which can be found on each CCG website, along with short films highlighting the views of Big Chat attendees and how they think the CCGs could improve how the involve people in the work of the local NHS.

http://www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/current-exercises/tell-us-how-we-can-involve-you-in-our-work/

http://www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/current-exercises/tell-us-how-we-can-involve-you-in-our-work/

Examples of how the CCGs have used people’s feedback to shape health services and strategies can also be found on their websites.

 

Tips for dining out with a person living with dementia

     Caring for somebody who is living with dementia can mean some planning and adjustments to things we often take for granted. One of those things is eating out, sometimes it can be difficult so Alzheimer’s Society in Southport, have some hints and tips from service users and carers from across Sefton to help you on your next outing.

  • I find people are very kind and helpful when I am out with mum. Mum struggles to pick up a cup without spilling her favourite cappuccino or hot chocolate – I have started getting her a straw which helps enormously, she enjoys it!
  • Child or smaller portions are about the right size and usually easier to eat.
  • I often take mum to the garden centre for lunch – soup and a roll, cappuccino and a cake!  We go early to avoid the queues.  I sit mum at a table then go and get the food.
  • We try to book a restaurant when its open, then we can choose a secluded place to sit to avoid too much noise and distractions. We can order quickly so there is not too much time to wait. We often decide what we are going to eat beforehand so there is even less delay. We tend to have a main meal and dessert, and then home for coffee.
  • I take Mum for a coffee and cake rather than a big meal as she gets agitated after a few minutes and it’s easier to drink up and go if we need to. 
  • With family meals, we tend to get takeaway fish and chips at home so that if dad doesn’t feel up to participating, it’s no big deal.
  • Visit places at quieter times of the day and avoid weekends.
  • Choose places with good lighting, not too loud background noise and, if possible an establishment where staff are Dementia Friends. 
  • Using the same establishment to provide familiarity and also the staff/management can identify your needs. (Lots of napkins, quiet table, close to toilets). Dependant on ability pre-order a selection of finger foods to be placed on the table, avoids any issues with cutlery, everybody can eat the same food. As a past restaurant manager, I would be happy to provide a regular order for my guests. 
  • Having the appropriate drinking vessel for the person with dementia, (if they require a beaker bring one). As a dementia champion i have not encountered many restaurants that have dementia friends training for all staff so please ask for what you need.
  • When my step mum went into a Care Home and found going out difficult, we used to take a picnic into the Home, and eat it in the garden. Her favourite smoked salmon and cream cheese sandwiches and cakes. We would talk about places we had been out for picnics in the past and it brought back happy memories. We had some lovely afternoons without the stress all round if she had difficulties when we were out in a restaurant or cafe.
  • My wife has an eating disorder and can’t manage a regular meal.   As a result I order a main and an extra plate. Initially it was worried it might be a bit embarrassing but nobody batted an eyelid.

     These helpful tips are from people caring for others living with dementia and how they have been able to find workarounds whilst out and about. Most cafes and restaurants are more than happy to help, so always ask if there is something you need or if you have any specific requirements. Living with dementia means just that – living.

     Cllr Cummins Cabinet member for Adult social care said ‘We hope to encourage more businesses in Sefton to become ‘Dementia Friendly’ for carers and people living with dementia alike. These tips for eating out are brilliant because they come directly from those dealing with dementia. We hope to make everyday outings as enjoyable as we can for everybody in Sefton’

     Linda Lawson, Information Worker for the Society said ‘Eating out when you have dementia can be a challenging experience for both the person with this condition and those who care for them. The best suggestions to make this experience more relaxing and pleasurable come directly from those living with dementia as we know they really do work. We want to encourage more cafes and restaurants to become ‘dementia friendly’, small changes such as clear signage, good lighting and staff receiving free Dementia Friends training can make a huge difference to a person living with dementia.’

     If you would like any further information about Alzheimer’s Society and dementia support in Sefton please contact 01704 539 967 or E-mail southport@alzheimers.org.uk or you can visit their website for more information Website www.alzheimers.org.uk or visit the Sefton Dementia Action alliance website to see what’s going on around Sefton http://www.dementiaaction.org.uk/local_alliances/3794_sefton_daa

Chance to take part in health survey

Sefton Councils’s Public Health team is working in partnership with Healthwatch Sefton to encourage as many Sefton residents as possible to complete a survey as part of the NHS Health Check programme.

This is a national programme which aims to check for early signs of heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, Type 2 diabetes or dementia.

The survey data will help to improve the programme and so Sefton’s Public Health team want to hear from local people to evaluate Sefton’s NHS health checks.

Already many people have submitted their comments via the online survey but there is still time to register yours. Click on this link to take you to the survey which closes at the end of November:
https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/SeftonHealthCheck

If you have any queries about the survey then please contact the Healthwatch Sefton team on 0800 206 1304 / 0151 920 0726 ext 214 or email: info@healthwatchsefton.co.uk

 

#CleanerSeas for Sefton

 Whether you swim, paddle, or simply enjoy a stroll on one of the Sefton beaches, you can be assured, once again, that the quality of the water is cleaner than at any time in the last 30 years.

   

  For the second year in a row the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has published statistics that reveal that all 31 of the North West’s bathing waters meet the government’s required standards for water quality.

     The 2017 classifications of bathing waters in Sefton are;

  • Formby beach has been rated Excellent – the highest, cleanest class;
  • Southport and Ainsdale have been rated Good – generally good water quality.

Full classifications can be found here: www.environment.data.gov.uk/bwq/profiles/

     A range of stakeholders have contributed to reducing pollution and improving the regions rivers, lakes and the sea, including the Environment Agency, United Utilities and the local community.

You can continue to help maintain, and improve, these standards by making small changes at home and at the beach:

• Only flush the 3P’s down the toilet – poo, pee and paper. Everything else goes in the bin!

• Pour cooled kitchen fats in the bin, not down the sink – it can cause blockages and sewage to overflow.

• Pick up after your dog and put it in the bin.

• Don’t feed birds at the beach and keep outdoor areas free of food waste.

• Always put litter in the bin or take it home if it’s full. 

Dementia service users turn back time at vintage music afternoon

A specialist Southport day service for Sefton residents with dementia turned back the clock this week and entertained clients with a musical variety afternoon.

Tuneful memories from the last half century and beyond were on offer at Brookdale Resource Centre in Ainsdale which is run by the borough’s leading adult social care provider, New Directions.

Stars of the show were the Tarleton-based Dolly Mops, a 12-strong group of retired singers and dancers who soon had the Brookdale service users singing along to their varied repertoire.

This ranged from songs from shows like Oklahoma, and country and western classics, to hits made famous by Elvis Presley and Liza Minnelli in Cabaret.

Meanwhile, as the concert was staged on Halloween, staff were attired in suitably spooky fancy dress, and items on the afternoon tea menu included edible spider cakes and blood-red beverages.

Brookdale Resource Centre’s day service enables the carers of Sefton residents with advanced dementia to have an important respite break.

Service users enjoy a wide range of activities including arts and crafts, sensory stimulation and music and reminiscence therapies.

Brookdale Manager, Salwa Moustafa, commented:

“This was a really lovely event and we’ve had some excellent feedback from everyone who attended.

“The Dolly Mops put on a terrific show, with a wide-ranging programme and frequent costume changes, which ensured there was something to suit all musical tastes during the course of the afternoon.”

New Directions was established in Sefton in 2007 as the first local authority social care trading company in the country.

Ten years on, the organisation remains at the forefront of the local care sector, with a team of more than 300 staff caring for older Sefton residents, or people with disabilities or mental health support needs.

For more information about the services offered by New Directions, or to find out about joining the team, ring 0151 934 3726 or visit www.ndirections.co.uk.

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