Please follow & like us

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Instagram

Hundreds of volunteers help launch Green Sefton

Hundreds of volunteers turned out to help celebrate the launch of Green Sefton on World Oceans Day (June 8).

Litter picks and waterside clean-ups were held across the borough ahead of a special launch event at Crosby Coastal Park to welcome the formation of Green Sefton, a brand new team to help keep Sefton clean, green and beautiful.

Clean-ups were held at Southport’s Marine Lake, Ainsdale Beach and the Brewery Lane stretch of the Leeds-Liverpool canal.

Green Sefton brings together Coast & Countryside, Parks & Greenspaces, Flooding & Coastal Erosion, Risk Management and Grounds Maintenance teams all together to ensure a joined up approach to the vital management, development and oversight of Sefton’s beautiful coastline, parks and green spaces for years to come.

Residents had the chance to meet the Green Sefton team who explained the work they will do, from land management and community engagement to vital work surveying the changing shape of Sefton’s coast and what this means to residents and visitors.

Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing, said: “We want to to say a massive thank you to all the community groups, volunteers and green-fingered helpers who came out to help on World Oceans Day.

“Sefton is a clean, green and beautiful borough that is internationally recognised for its natural beauty and we will build on this through the work of Green Sefton and working closely with our volunteers.

“Green Sefton has been created to make sure we continue our focus on a collaborative approach to the management, development and oversight of our beautiful coastline, parks and green spaces.

“We believe this will also encourage more community cohesion, more involvement with our volunteers and residents, as well as eco organisations.”

For updates on Green Sefton events, activities and partnership opportunities, check out Sefton Council’s social media channels.

Hundreds Help To Beat Cancer At Southport Race for Life

Just under 1000 women united against cancer on Sunday 3rd June by taking part in Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life at Princes Park, Southport.

Over 900 women of all ages, abilities, shapes and sizes showed their incredible commitment to the cause as they took their place at the start line to help beat cancer sooner.

Now organisers of the Race for Life events are sending a heart-felt message of thanks to everyone who took part and all their supporters.

And they’re asking them to make every step count by paying in their sponsorship money as soon as possible so that it can be used to fund life-saving research.

Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life, in partnership with Tesco, is an inspiring women-only series of 5k, 10k, Pretty Muddy, Half Marathon and Hiking events which raises millions of pounds every year to find new ways to tackle cancer.

 

Sarah Hunter, Cancer Research UK’s Southport Events Manager, said: “Life-saving research is being funded right now thanks to people like the women of Southport who join the fight at Race for Life.

“By taking part and raising money, our participants play a crucial role in helping to turn discoveries made in the lab into new, better treatments for patients in Southport and across the UK and we’d like to thank everyone who took part in the event on Sunday.

“The atmosphere on the day was hugely moving – full of emotion, courage, tears and laughter – as people came together to remember loved ones lost to cancer or celebrate the lives of those dear to them who have survived. Race for Life offers a unique opportunity for like-minded ladies to unite against a disease that affects us all in some way.

“Now we’re asking everyone who took part, and all the friends, family and colleagues who pledged to sponsor them, to return the money they’ve raised as soon as possible. Money raised – whether it’s £10 or £100 – will help Cancer Research UK scientists find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease, helping save more lives.”

 

One in two people in the UK will be diagnosed with cancer at some stage in their lives, but the good news is more people are surviving the disease now than ever before. Cancer survival in the UK has doubled since the early 1970s and Cancer Research UK’s work has been at the heart of that progress.

Dr Áine McCarthy, Cancer Research UK’s Senior Science Communications Officer, said: “There are over 200 types of cancer and we need continued investment in research to help us find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat them all. That’s why we need everyone who took part in Race for Life in Southport to take the vital last step by returning their sponsorship money so that our scientists, doctors and nurses can continue to make vital strides forward in research.”

Sponsorship money can be paid online, by phone, by cheque or in person at a Cancer Research UK shop.

For information on returning sponsorship money, or to make a donation, visit raceforlife.org

Avoid driving penalty heartache this World Cup campaign!

As the World Cup approaches, Liverpool Football Club’s Academy has teamed up with the Merseyside Road Safety Partnership to highlight the dangers of driving the morning after drinking alcohol.

The campaign was launched with players from the Reds U18 side who took part in an interactive session aimed at highlighting the effect that alcohol can have on people’s reactions.

Many people will enjoy a few drinks as they watch the football and most wouldn’t even consider getting into their car and driving afterwards.

However, there is a real risk that people who would never deliberately drink and drive may still be over the limit, or unfit to drive, the ‘morning after’.

This is because it takes a lot longer than most people think for alcohol to pass through the body. On average it takes around one hour per unit of alcohol, though this can vary depending on a number of factors.

Merseyside Road Safety Partnership features local authority members, including Sefton Council, as well as additional partners including Merseyside Police, Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service, Merseytravel and Highways England.

Station Manager Steve Pang, Spokesperson for Merseyside Road Safety Partnership, said: “The decision to get behind the wheel of a vehicle the morning after drinking can have very serious consequences, not only for the driver but also potentially for other road users around them.

“We would encourage people to enjoy watching the tournament but to remember that your safety and the safety of others is vital. If you have been drinking the previous evening and are thinking about driving the next morning don’t take that risk.”

Paul Mountford, Merseyside Police Lead for drink and drug driving, said: “Merseyside Police will be conducting numerous roadside operations and breath and drug testing hundreds of drivers across Merseyside throughout this campaign to ensure that drivers understand the principles of this campaign – that the only safe drink drive limit is zero.

“Many drivers are unaware that even a small amount of alcohol may affect their driving ability, placing themselves at an increased risk of a crash and arrest. They may be arrested for ‘drink driving’ even if they pass a breathalyser if the officer considers them to be unfit. This is particularly relevant the following day when many will not consider their driving fitness after a night’s sleep.

“We are also reminding drivers that we will not tolerate those who take illegal drugs and drive. Similar to alcohol, driving while under the influence of illegal drugs can place the driver and other road users at risk. Our roadside tests aim to not only detect these drivers but also deter them from getting behind the wheel.”

Phil Roscoe, Head of Education and Welfare from Liverpool FC said: “The session with the Road Safety team was really interesting and helped to raise awareness of the effects that alcohol can have on your body, even the morning after having a drink.

“The message from the campaign is relevant at any time of the year, but it is particular important to in the run up to the World Cup to help people enjoy watching the tournament safely.”

The main message from the campaign is not ‘don’t drink’, but ‘don’t drink anything if you are driving’ and ‘don’t drink heavily if you have to drive the following morning’.

Can you help keep Sefton’s air clean?

As part of its 2030 Vision, Sefton Council is committed to maintaining a clean, green and beautiful borough. This pledge encourages everybody to work together to keep Sefton clean and green, with a commitment to recycling, low pollution and better air quality.

 As part of this assurance, the Council has put an action plan in place to help minimise the impact of air pollution across the borough.

 However, there are also things that residents can do to help improve air quality in their area and in preparation for National Clean Air Day (June 21), the council is asking the public to pledge to make a small change to help reduce pollution. By undertaking these small changes, everybody can work together to keep Sefton’s air clean.

  1. Try alternative travel
    Did you know that 55% of car journeys are less than 5 miles? Many of these journeys could easily be walked, or made by bike or public transport. By reducing the number of journeys made using a car, you could make a real impact on the air quality in your area. Sefton Council’s Active Travel programme promotes different ways you can get around the borough. Find out more at www.sefton.gov.uk/ActiveTravel
  2. Share your journey
    When two or more people share a car and travel together, it allows more people to benefit from the convenience of a car, shares travel costs and ultimately reduces congestion and air pollution. There are car sharing websites available online or you could consider starting a car sharing club in your work place.
  3. Become an eco-driver
    Many drivers pick up bad habits after years on the road, but making a few small changes will not only save you money in reduced fuel costs, but will also reduce emissions of air pollutants and impact on climate change. Small changes include reducing the use of air conditioning; avoiding unnecessary idling of your car engine; avoiding sharp acceleration and harsh braking; and shifting into a higher gear as soon as possible
  4. Change up your engine
    Consider purchasing a lower emissions, hybrid or electric vehicle. These vehicles are less damaging to the environment than those with diesel engines or with a high fuel consumption.
  5. Think about what you’re burning
    It’s not just vehicles that can be damaging to air quality, but things like burning garden waste and wood can also have a negative impact on air quality and public health. Burning garden waste is not only a nuisance to your neighbours but also releases pollutants into the atmosphere. While solid fuels such as wood, wood chips and pellets are renewable fuels with lower carbon dioxide emissions than gas, coal or electricity, they still emit pollutants like nitrogen oxide and particulates.

 Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing, said:

“Air pollution can have a poor effect on public health, particularly for residents with existing lung conditions. For this reason, it is so important for us to all work together to make changes that can keep Sefton clean and green.”

 Cllr Paulette Lapin, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Regulation and Compliance, added:

“It’s easy for people to fall into habits like driving to the corner shop or leaving the engine on while waiting to pick up a friend, but it’s important to remember that these habits are having a detrimental effect on our environment. By making small changes to this behaviour and considering alternative ways of travel, the public can make a real difference to air quality across the borough.”

Day Centre puts the spotlight on dementia

A Southport day service for Sefton residents with dementia staged a series of special events recently in support of a national initiative to raise awareness of the condition.

Staff, service users and families at the specialist Brookdale Resource Centre in Ainsdale took part in a range of activities to mark Dementia Awareness Week which is organised by the Alzheimer’s Society.

Highlights of the week at the centre – which is run by Sefton’s leading adult social care provider, New Directions – included two fun afternoons of reminiscence and musical memories.

One featured popular Southport vocalist Sophie Bennett, making a return visit to Brookdale with her wide-ranging repertoire of classic songs from the last half-century and beyond.

The second featured music from Remember When, the three-piece jukebox band of Bootle-based charity Sefton Opera, which provides health and wellbeing therapies to older people.

However, there was also a more serious side to the week, which included an information and advice event on dementia issues with representatives of the Alzheimer’s Society, and a training session on how to become one of Sefton’s many Dementia Friends.

Brookdale Manager, Salwa Moustafa, said it’s important for the service to lend its support to campaigns like Dementia Awareness Week.

She explained: “A key objective of this week’s events was to provide fun for our service users, and thanks to the efforts of our staff and the entertainers they all joined in and had a really enjoyable time.

“However, it’s also important to use national events like this to raise awareness of dementia in our area, and the effect it can have on local sufferers and their families, and in doing also challenge the stigma associated with the condition.”

Figures indicate that someone in the world now develops dementia every three seconds, and that by 2050 around 131.5 million people around the globe will be living with the condition.

Brookdale Resource Centre enables the carers of service users with advanced dementia to have an important respite break.

Clients enjoy a wide range of activities at the centre including arts and crafts, sensory stimulation and music and reminiscence therapies.

Search Box