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Sefton launches no-drinking zones to combat anti-social behaviour

Sefton Council has established a number of alcohol-restricted spaces in a bid to tackle anti-social behaviour and help to build safer and healthier communities.

The No Drinking Zones are designed to encourage more responsible drinking and ensure that the law-abiding majority can enjoy public spaces – safe from crime and anti-social behaviour.

This initiative demonstrates the Council’s commitment to residents and visitors so that everyone can have the peace and quiet they deserve to enjoy the places in which they live and work.

The areas will also help to improve the quality of life in local communities through the prevention of problems or nuisances.

The restricted sites are located in Southport, Formby, Crosby, Waterloo and Bootle and do not include any licensed premises.

The following roads are within the No Drinking Zones:

Southport Town Centre

The area bounded by Kings Gardens, Promenade, Seabank Road, Gordon Street, Lord Street, Union Street, Castle Street, Hill Street, Wright Street, London Street, Chapel Street, Tulketh Street, Bridge Street, Eastbank Street, Princess Street, Market Street, King Street, Duke Street, Morrison’s Car Park

Bootle Town Centre 

The area bounded by Merton Road, Washington Parade, Marsh Lane and Litherland Road

Formby

Duke Street Park, Kings Road, Phillips Lane down to the footpath (including Meadow Croft and Phillips Close), Formby Railway Station and car park, Formby Bridge, Formby Street and Andrews Lane

Crosby/Waterloo

The pedestrianised area of Liverpool Road up to The Green, the pedestrianised area of Moor Lane to the end of Telegraph House, the area of pavement on Coronation Road in front of Crown Building, Moorside Park, Victoria Park, Coronation Park, Alexandra Park, Marine Gardens, Crescent Gardens, Adelaide Gardens, Beach Lawn Gardens, St John’s Road and South Road.

The effect of this Order is that all persons are prohibited from consuming alcohol and must dispose of any vessel believed to contain alcohol, when asked to do so by a Constable or Authorised person, when it is believed that they are committing or likely to commit Anti-Social Behaviour in a public place. An Authorised Person / Constable can require any person:

• To not consume alcohol or anything the Authorised Person / Constable reasonably believes to be alcohol, in sealed or unsealed vessels.
• To surrender anything in the person’s possession which is, or the Authorised person/Constable reasonably believes to be alcohol or likely to be used as a container for alcohol.

If a person fails without reasonable excuse to comply with a requirement of a Constable or Authorised Person) A Constable or Authorised Officer may issue a fixed penalty notice. The amount payable under the fixed penalty notice is £50 if paid within 10 days, rising to £75 thereafter

Sefton Council will work closely with Merseyside Police and other partners to monitor the No Drinking Zones.

‘Examine Your Options’ this bank holiday

Local health commissioners are encouraging Sefton residents to examine their options if they become unwell over the bank holiday weekend.

Anyone who thinks they may need to access health services over the bank holiday is being urged to check opening times for walk in centres, GP practices and chemists and also think about ordering any repeat prescriptions they need before the long weekend begins.

Dr Craig Gillespie, local GP and acting chair of NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), said: “The bank holiday weekend can be a good opportunity to relax and unwind but it’s important people know how to access health services, should they need to. Many GP practices will be closed on the bank holiday, so it’s particularly important for people to examine their options if they become poorly.”

Dr Rob Caudwell, a Southport GP and chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “There are a variety of services on offer to people such as the advice on the NHS choices website, and the NHS 111 telephone number. Pharmacists are also available to provide free, confidential advice about common health problems such as coughs, colds and sore throats.”

The local NHS in Sefton is also reminding people that A&E and 999 services are for life-threatening and serious conditions.

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the region there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

Pharmacy Services

Many pharmacies will be open throughout the bank holiday weekend and the best way to find out which pharmacy is open and when is to visit our ‘Your Services Health page’.

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can also help you to self-care and prepare for many common illnesses and offer advice on which medicines to keep in stock at home.

In Sefton – whilst all pharmacies provide advice and treatment for a range of minor illnesses and ailments, a number in Sefton offer Care at the Chemist, which ensures our most vulnerable patients who don’t routinely pay for their prescriptions have free and easy access to over the counter medicines they may need without the need to see a doctor.

 

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies in your local area by visiting www.nhs.uk. This useful website also includes a handy symptom checker.

 

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

 

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

 

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

 

Walk-in centres

Litherland Walk in Centre is open 8am – 8pm every day. in Litherland Town Hall, Hatton Hill Rd, L21 9JN. Call 0151 475 4667.

No matter where you live in Sefton you can simply drop in – there is no need for an appointment and all ages can get treatment here. The service treats minor illnesses and injuries that do not need a visit to accident and emergency (A&E). Remember A&E is for serious and life threatening illnesses or injuries. 

West Lancashire Health Centre – 8am to 8pm, 7 days a week 

Skelmersdale Walk-in Centre – 8am to 8pm, 7 days a week

 

Patient Access

Manage your repeat prescriptions and make GP appointments from the comfort of your own home, without having to venture outside, by using the new FREE Patient Access website and smartphone app. Simply search for ‘Patient Access’ in the app store.

Remember though, if using Patient Access for the very first time, you will first have to contact your GP practice so that you can register to use the app.

For information about services that can help in south Sefton over the bank holiday please visit our ‘Your Services Health page’

Welfare support

Sefton Council is continuing to support some of the borough’s most vulnerable residents by earmarking more than half-a-million pounds to help them.

 Despite a continued reduction in support from the Government, the council has committed £500,000 to its welfare support scheme. The scheme was established to provide support for vulnerable, low-income families hit by unexpected financial crises, domestic emergencies and the impact of welfare reform.

 This funding will be monitored closely and may be re-evaluated if the demand for services exceeds the current budget. 

 The council has committed to continue to fund the administration of its local welfare services to ensure that those who need support are able to access it when support is needed. Financial resources will also be used to support Sefton’s helping hand service which manages the provision of essential household items.

 South Sefton and Southport foodbanks will also benefit from a tranche of the funding which will help the services to maintain the necessary levels of food and other items in response to referrals from the council’s local welfare scheme. In addition, a significant portion of the budget will help to support the provision of gas and electricity awards to applicants.

 Without this funding, many people across Sefton would not have access to vital hardship support, forcing them to go without or faced with no option but to take out high cost loans to pay for basics such as food, energy or furniture.
 
 Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing, said: “It’s telling that due to the Government’s austerity measures we are seeing an increase in residents who need additional welfare support. It is clear that food bank usage is growing and more and more people, including those who are in work, are finding it difficult to support themselves as a result of welfare reform.

“The Council has rightly set aside a significant budget to help keep essential welfare services running, but the hard truth is that even this extra financial support may not be enough for these vital services to meet the increased demand.”

 Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Communities, added: “It is a shame that in 2018 we are still seeing so many Sefton residents who are finding themselves impacted by welfare reform and facing poverty.

 “Government cuts have meant that services that provide support to vulnerable people are finding themselves at breaking point and local charities are finding it increasingly difficult to cope and offer support.

 “It is so important for the council to ensure that its local communities are able to receive the support they need when they are experiencing severe financial hardship. We are doing all we can when sadly we know more needs to be done.”

Leading Sefton health figures say ‘no’ to sugary drinks!

Sefton Council is working with Food Active to promote the new GULP (Give Up Loving Pop) Early Years campaign called ‘Kind to Teeth’.

 The campaign aims to improve knowledge and raise awareness of the health risks associated with consumption of sugary drinks in under-fives. 

 Developed by registered nutritionists, the campaign has been launched as part of National Smile Month and is the UK’s largest and longest running campaign to promote good oral health.  

 Research shows that by the age of five, nearly a third of children had obvious decay in their milk teeth.  In another study, 12% of three-year-olds were found to have evidence of tooth decay having on average three decayed, missing or filled teeth – and sugary drinks are a major part of the problem.

 This is despite the fact that babies are only recommended to consume breast milk (or formula milk if necessary) until six months and then milk and water are the best sources of hydration for babies and young children.

 Sugar is not necessary for the diet, especially for children and when consumed in the form of sugary drinks, can cause a whole host of health issues, from tooth decay to obesity and type 2 diabetes. Lots of sugar can often be hiding in many baby juices and other sugary drinks marketed at the early years.  

 The Kind to Teeth campaign has been developed by registered nutritionists, dental health and early year’s specialists and forms part of the well-known GULP campaign.  It is aimed at parents of children under five years of age, to help promote healthier drinking habits in the early years and will involve a number of electronic resources for local authorities to utilise.

 Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing, said: “Improving the health of Sefton’s young children is a key priority for us, so I am very pleased that the Kind to Teeth campaign is being promoted in Sefton. 

 “Nearly a quarter of our 5-year-olds start school with dental decay and a quarter in Reception year are overweight or are an unhealthy weight by the time they start school. Tackling unhealthy drink habits in the early years is a crucial preventative measure to protect our young children against poor dental health and weight gain”

 Matthew Ashton, Director of Public Health for Sefton and Knowsley, added: “When children are young, we have a fantastic opportunity to influence healthy food and drink patterns, as habits are often established when children are young.  

 “This campaign will help to educate parents on the health risks associated with consuming sugary drinks in the early years, and emphasise that water is the best source of hydration for their young one. We hope it will help to influence healthy drinking patterns from the early years and throughout their growth and development into adulthood.”

Have your say on Sefton’s Equalities consultation

Residents and visitors still have time to have their say on Sefton’s Council’s updated Equality and Diversity Policy.

The refreshed Equality and Diversity Policy 2016 – 2020 helps set out Sefton’s approach to making sure all staff are equipped with the relevant knowledge and skills to meet the diverse needs of the borough.

Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Communities and Housing, said: “This is a very important policy and we encourage as many people as possible to take part in our consultation.

“The policy sets out our approach to equality and diversity for the next three years and shows how we meet the requirements of the Equality Act 2010.

“In everything we do as a council, we make sure that our services are accessible and that we encourage supportive and cohesive communities.”

Those wishing to have a say on the policy have until June 29 to make their views known.

A draft copy of the refreshed policy is available to view online via www.engagespace.co.uk/sefton or by calling 0151 934 3202

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