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Important information to help rough sleepers in cold winter months

Sefton Council has a range of services for rough sleepers throughout the borough which are available all year round.

Services, run by Light For Life, are at hand as we to try and reduce the number of people sleeping rough in Sefton, especially during the colder winter months.

This is especially important during the cold winter months between December 2018 and February 2019.

Light For Life’s winter shelter, which will open as weather conditions dictate, will be offered at Southport Eco Centre and will be open from 10pm to 7am with light refreshments and a warm, dry, safe environment for people to access.

As part of this service, outreach teams will proactively seek out rough sleepers and encourage them to access the night shelter.

If you are concerned about someone’s wellbeing, please direct them to the Shelter or to the sit up services available all year round.

The help of the public is always appreciated and to report an incident of rough sleeping in Sefton please call the Rough Sleeper Outreach Team via Light for Life on 01704 501256 or 07918 746042 outside normal office hours and weekends.

Alternatively, email housing.options@sefton.gov.uk and provide details of the location and any description of the person. We will acknowledge your email and give you a response to your report.

Sefton Council also commission Sefton Supported Housing Group to provide a Homeless Sit Up service.

These services are available nightly and you can book in between 8pm to 9pm. and it promises a safe, warm and caring environment where service users will be given a mat and sleeping bag.

There are also shower facilities and hot food & drinks until 8am the next morning.

Services are provided at BOSCO House, Merton Road, Bootle (0151 944 1818) or New Start, Leyland Road, Southport, (01704 547 741).

Veterans in Sefton have also been commissioned to provide support to people who are currently serving or who have served in the Armed Forces, both regular and reservists, their families and dependents, who are homeless or threatened with homelessness.

ViS are based at The Brunswick Youth and Community Centre in Bootle.

For any further information call 0151 257 6371 or attend the ‘NAAFI Break’, Wednesdays 10.30am – 12.pm.

Registrars services remain open to the public during Christmas 2018

Sefton’s registrars will continue to operate during the 2018 Christmas shutdown period.

Registrars will be available, via appointment only, to register a death in the borough at Southport Town Hall on:

December 24 (2.15pm – 2pm)
December 27 (9.15am-4pm)
December 28 (9.15am-4pm)
December 31 (9.15am – 3pm)

A limited number of marriage notice appointments will also be available during this period.

For more information or to book an appointment call 0151 934 2011.

Cinderella must go to the Hall! Tickets now on sale for Bootle panto

Tickets are now on sale for the annual Waterloo and Crosby Theatre company’s pantomime production at Bootle Town Hall

The theatre group will perform the classic Cinderella, as written by Roy Hartley and directed by Julie Cook, at the Town Hall on Oriel Road between Friday December 7 and Sunday December 16.

Adult tickets are priced at £10 while concessionary tickets  (children, OAPs and students) are on sale for £8.

Group rates and family tickets (two adults and two children) are also available for £30.

Bootle Town Hall is fully wheelchair accessible and parking outside the Town Hall is available but limited.

For those travelling via public transport Bootle Oriel Road train station is a short one minute walk from Bootle Town Hall.

Performance times are as follows:

Friday December 7 (7.30pm)
Saturday December 8 (2pm)
Sunday December 9 (2pm)

Friday December 14 (7.30pm)
Saturday December 15 (2pm)
Sunday December 16 (2pm)

To book tickets visit www.theatreaco.org.uk or call 07490134581.

New Apprentice Travelcard could save LCR apprentices more than £400 a year

Liverpool City Region Metro Mayor Steve Rotheram has officially launched one of the country’s best discounted travel schemes for young people in training.

The Apprentice Travelcard will give all those on apprenticeships aged 19-24 half-price bus travel across Merseyside, in line with the great affordable fares 16-19 year olds already enjoy.

Announced earlier this year by Liverpool City Region Metro Mayor Steve Rotheram alongside Bus Alliance partners Stagecoach, Arriva and other Merseyside bus operators, the Apprentice Travelcard is aimed at removing one of the main barriers to entry for young people wanting to start apprenticeships – access to affordable transport.

The Apprentice Travelcard will allow holders to purchase weekly and four-weekly passes in line with great value Solo fares for under-19s, allowing unlimited travel across the Merseyside bus network and potentially saving users more than £400 a year.

The roll-out comes just a month after the Metro Mayor launched a ‘Big Bus Debate’, a large-scale public conversation about the bus system in the Liverpool City Region and how new devolved powers could be used to drive improvements in service and give greater control to passengers.

Holders of the Apprentice Travelcard must be enrolled participants on registered apprenticeship schemes.

Application packs are available from training providers and at Merseytravel Travel Centres, further details are available at merseytravel.gov.uk/apprentice

Liverpool City Region Metro Mayor Steve Rotheram said: “Apprenticeships are a vital pathway to work for young people across the Liverpool City Region, leading to skilled and well-paid jobs.

“But we know that the cost of travel has been putting some off taking-up apprenticeship opportunities. That’s why I’m so pleased that we’ve been able to introduce this scheme which could save hundreds of pounds a year for apprentices under the age of 25.”

Outstanding paramedic work helps NWAS Trust achieve Good rating

England’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals has welcomed improvements at North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust following its latest inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

A team of inspectors from the Care Quality Commission visited North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust in June and July 2018 to check the quality of three core services: emergency and urgent care service, resilience, and the emergency operation centres. CQC also looked specifically at management and leadership to answer the key question: Is the trust well led?

The trust is now rated as Good for the overall quality of its services. The trust is also rated as Good for being safe, caring, effective, responsive to people’s needs and well led.

Inspectors found that work by the community paramedics was outstanding. They worked as members of a multidisciplinary team with community nurses, mental health nurses, teachers and in care homes, with the needs of the community at the forefront.

Staff were involved in initiatives ranged from helping mental health patients overcome fears of medical procedures to preventative measures aimed at reducing admissions to emergency departments by residents of care home residents.

The Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Professor Ted Baker, said:

“With 1.4 million calls per year there is constant pressure on the ambulance services in the North West to be there whenever we need them, at all times of the day. I am pleased to acknowledge the hard work and continuous improvement made by North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust to build upon the findings of our last inspection and have helped the trust improve its rating to Good.

“We found a patient-centred service where staff consistently showed compassion and respect to patients and callers during some very stressful and demanding situations.”

Full reports including the latest ratings are available at: https://www.cqc.org.uk/provider/RX7

In emergency and urgent care, there was also a new staffing structure that provided support to ambulance teams in responding to risk. Staff had access to enhanced clinical support when they needed it. Staff told inspectors they were always given time to make safeguarding referrals.

In the period until April 2018, the trust’s performance for dealing with Category 1 emergency calls had improved and was now better than the national average.

The trust’s resilience services (specialist teams who deal with extreme emergencies), have been rated Good overall. Managers ensured members of the team felt were valued. The Hazardous Area Operating Team (HART) and resilience service had developed highly effective working relationships with partner agencies. They took a lead in regular joint working days with the local group forums.

The emergency operations centre had looked at opportunities to learn from incidents and improve patient safety. There was a focus on continuous learning, including the use of pilot schemes to improve services.

The inspection found there was a strong leadership group in place with a positive culture based around the needs of people who used the service. Senior managers recognised that culture within some areas of the trust required further improvement.

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