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Tails start wagging with interactive Good Dog Code posters

Tails will be wagging with the launch of a brand new smartphone campaign from Sefton Council Good Dogs Code.

The Sefton Good Dog Code has launched a series of QR codes which will be displayed across parks, beaches and main roads in Sefton to encourage good and responsible dog ownership in the borough.

The interactive smartphone adverts are simple to use. After taking a photo of the code on a phone camera, users are directed to the Sefton Good Dog Code website which details how dog owners can encourage others to be responsible for their pets.

Local residents and dog lovers have worked alongside Sefton in the creation of the Code, which tells residents to clean up after their pets, respect those who don’t like dogs, follow the rules and ensure their dog is socialized before it mingles with other dogs.

Steve Smith, Sefton Council’s Environmental Health & Trading Standards Manager said: “The code was jointly put together by ourselves and residents to promote responsible dog ownership.

“Along with the poster and flyers, we’ll now be placing QR codes around our parks, coastal areas and cemeteries which links to the online version of the Good Dog Code.

“There are plenty of ways you can be a responsible dog owner, from making sure you clean up after your pets to respecting none-dog lovers.

“Unfortunately some dog owners are not responsible and have no regard for their community. For these few, legislation is tough on them.

“Enforcement action such as fixed penalties and possible court action can be taken against these dog owners.”

Lyn Hilton the founder of local volunteer group ‘Sefton Dogs’ added: “What began as a campaign to ensure that our dogs could enjoy off lead experience at the beach and on our local nature reserves changed into a volunteer movement which aims for a friendly, informed and responsible approach to dog ownership in Sefton.”

Since July 2017, Sefton has had a Public Space Protection Order across the borough with informs dog owners about certain rules which must be followed.

For more information about these rules and to learn more about the Good Dog Code, visit www.sefton.gov.uk/thegooddogcode.

The Sefton Good Dog Code: What You Need To Know

The Sefton Good Dog Code is an informative campaign which encourages good and responsible dog ownership in the borough. 

For more information about these rules and to learn more about the Good Dog Code, visit www.sefton.gov.uk/thegooddogcode

Posters, leaflets and interactive smartphone adverts are going up in parks and public areas around Sefton following the launch of the Good Dog Code and the recent Public Space Protection Order. 

Local residents and dog lovers have worked alongside Sefton in the creation of the Code, which tells residents to clean up after their pets, respect those who don’t like dogs, follow the rules and ensure their dog is socialized before it mingles with other dogs. 

Cllr Paulette Lappin, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Regulation and Compliance, said: “The code was jointly put together by ourselves and residents to promote responsible dog ownership.

“Along with the poster and flyers, we’ll be placing QR codes around our parks, coastal areas and cemeteries which links to the online version of the Good Dog Code.

“There are plenty of ways you can be a responsible dog owner, from making sure you clean up after your pets to respecting none-dog lovers.

“Unfortunately some dog owners are not responsible and have no regard for their community. For these few, legislation is tough on them.

“Enforcement action such as fixed penalties and possible court action can be taken against these dog owners.”

Lyn Hilton the founder of local volunteer group ‘Sefton Dogs’ added: “What began as a campaign to ensure that our dogs could enjoy off lead experience at the beach and on our local nature reserves changed into a volunteer movement which aims for a friendly, informed and responsible approach to dog ownership in Sefton. 

“I am proud to say that since June of this year members of Sefton Dogs have been working closely with Sefton Council, attending promotional events, advising on publicity materials and building up a bank of helpful information online.”

Since July, Sefton has had a Public Space Protection Order across the borough with informs dog owners about certain rules which must be followed. 

Sefton Economic Strategy Consultation

Sefton Council is seeking views on the draft framework of a new Sefton Economic Strategy.

To have your say on the consultation, click here

Comments made from a consultation will present a rationale for the Council’s Growth Programme, one of the four key pillars of Framework for Change, agreed by the Council in January 2017.

Strategic economic growth is a key part of the Sefton 2030 Vision that the Council is currently developing. In 2016 when we asked our communities what mattered most to them, in their thousands they told us of their priorities and what was important to them for the future of the borough.

Some common messages included:

  • Investing in the infrastructure of the borough will help to provide a strong, sustainable economy, be it regenerating town centres and high streets, improving highways and connections, developing urban village communities that have affordable housing and access to social activities
  • Job opportunities is an important area that can support resilient people and places
  • Recognition that Sefton has many natural assets including the coast, local heritage and open spaces and these should be used in promoting the borough to attract businesses, investors and visitors.

A 7 week consultation has just opened and Sefton Council is urging as many people as possible to get involved.

Cllr Marion Atkinson, Sefton Council’s Labour Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Skills, said: “This is the first draft of the framework for a new economic strategy for Sefton and we really want to hear from all sectors of our communities.

“It sets out to identify the key economic and social challenges which should be the focus of the strategy and outlines the headline economic growth objective and the framework for action.

“We recognise the importance of working in partnership with our many key partners and stakeholders from the private sector, communities, voluntary sector and local businesses. This consultation is for everyone and can help define our future.

“We are now seeking views on this important document and would be grateful if everyone could spend a few minutes completing this questionnaire.”

The consultation will run from March 8, 2018 to April 27, 2018.

Consultation to launch over Birkdale School for the Hearing Impaired

A consultation into a proposed redevelopment of the former Birkdale School for Hearing Impaired Children in Southport is to launch following discussions between Sefton Council and Octopus Healthcare Group.

 Octopus Healthcare Group will run the consultation in the coming months regarding their multi-million pound investment proposal to redevelop 40 Lancaster Road, Birkdale into an Extra Care accommodation site.

 Their proposals includes the conversion and remodelling of the listed school building, construction of communal facilities, extra care accommodation and improvements to the grounds.

 The proposal is now subject to a community consultation before applications for planning and Listed Building Consent are submitted to Sefton Council’s Planning department.

A document from Octopus Healthcare Group about their proposed plans can be viewed here

 Cllr Daren Veidman, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Planning and Building Control, said: “It has long been the Council’s aspiration to work to secure a sustainable and sensitive use for the former Deaf School.

 “Over the last seven years the Council has directed significant resource trying to secure the site and to prevent the further deterioration of the building.

 “The beneficial future use of the building will secure its removal from the Council’s listed buildings at risk register while also contributing to the removal of West Birkdale conservation area from the national ‘at risk’ register.

“We have had intensive and detailed discussions with Octopus Healthcare over the last year and I would encourage the community to engage with their consultation, so that there is a strong local input into the proposals before formal applications are submitted to the Council.”

 A spokesperson for Octopus Healthcare added: “We are delighted to present our exciting proposals to the community at which will include an exhibition of the scheme at Southport Town Hall on March 15, 2018.

 “We would welcome the opportunity to introduce our concept to conserve, restore and develop this fantastic site.”

 Andy Baddeley, who leads the project for Octopus Healthcare said “This scheme presents a wonderful opportunity to safeguard this iconic building for future generations, yet provides a much needed retirement and extra care facility for people to really enjoy this unique place.”

 “Through these types of schemes we will be better placed to cater for the ageing population ensuring that there are suitable homes which will help downsizers retain their independence in later years.”

 The proposal is to create up to 120 extra care apartments and associated facilities to include a bistro, residents lounge, library and hair and beauty salon as well as providing on site care.

 The site at 40, Lancaster Road was originally opened as Terra Nova, a private boarding school in 1901 before it became the school for the partially hearing in 1948.

 It remained as such until 2003 when it was sold to developers and has remained vacant ever since. The building was made a grade II listed building in 1999.

Private Landlords need new licences from March 1

Private Landlords across Sefton are being reminded they will need to apply for a licence to rent out their property from March 1.

From this date, Sefton Council requires landlords of private rented properties in some parts of the borough to apply for a housing licence.

If you are a private landlord in Sefton and haven’t already, you need to check whether you will need a licence to rent out your property and if so, apply for one.

If your property is in the Bootle (L20, L21) area you may need a Selective Licence.

If your property is in Seaforth (L21), Waterloo (L22), Brighton-le-Sands (L23) or Southport (PR8, PR9) AND it is a House in Multiple Occupation (HMO) you may need an Additional (HMO) licence.

A full list of all streets affected along with further details of the schemes, licensing conditions and fees are available on sefton.gov.uk.

Cllr Trish Hardy, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member Communities and Housing, said: “I would strongly advise landlords to check whether their properties need a licence and, if so, to apply for one as soon as possible.

“This is a new scheme for Sefton and landlords will need to have applied for a licence by the beginning of September.

“A rigorous enforcement regime will commence after this date and landlords found to be operating unlicensed property will face tough penalties. New staff have been recruited to operate and enforce the schemes which will be funded through the licence fees. The team will also include a new apprentice.
If a property falls within either the Selective or Additional (HMO) licensing areas and is licensable under the Mandatory scheme landlords will not need to also apply for either a Selective or Additional (HMO) licence.

Landlords will be required to meet a range of licence conditions, and show that they have appropriate management arrangements in place.

It is an offence, which can result in fines of any amount, if the landlord or person in control of the property
• fails to apply for a licence for a licensable property, or
• allows a property to be occupied by more people than is permitted under the licence
• breaches any of the licence conditions

If you are a landlord, a person managing a property within the areas of the designation you are advised to check whether your property will require a licence and ensure that you apply for one per property.

You can check if you need a housing licence, which type of licence you need and apply for a housing licence at www.housinglicensing.sefton.gov.uk.

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