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Key travel & safety advice for Tall Ships Regatta

Visitors planning to watch the Tall Ships regatta from the Sefton coastline over the May bank holiday are being advised to stay safe at all times.

Anyone heading to Crosby beach on Monday, May 28 to watch the regatta is asked to stay within 50 metres from the promenade and watch for any tidal movement. Visitors to the coast are recommended not to go past Crosby Coastguard Station in a northerly direction.

On May 28, the seafront car parks will remain open but parking on nearby streets will be restricted (except for emergency vehicles).

The Waterloo Festival, being held at the bottom of South Road/Crosby Lakeside, and pop up village at Burbo Bank are also taking place during the bank holiday weekend (May 27/28) with extra people expected at Crosby seafront.

Anyone planning to travel to this area is asked to walk, cycle or use public transport as revised train and bus timetables will be in operation on the Bank Holiday (visit www.merseyrail.org or check with local bus operators).

Beach Safety is very important – please avoid muddy areas and listen to any warning messages for the RNLI lifeguards who will be present on the beach.

Visitors should be prepared for all weather conditions – including rain or sunshine. Concessions will be available and people visiting the area are asked to take their rubbish home with them or use the bins provided.

Cllr Marion Atkinson, Sefton Council’s Labour Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Skills, said: “Safety is paramount on the Sefton coastline as this event takes place.

“If you’re local, consider staying local. Walking or cycling may be the quickest and easiest way for you to get to and from the event.

“The popular Waterloo Festival is also on during the bank holiday weekend with crowds expected to attend along with the pop up village at Burbo Bank. The Council has really supported both these events and it is set to be a really busy weekend benefiting the whole area with local businesses using our wonderful assets to the maximum.

“If you do watch the regatta pass from the Sefton coastline, please stay safe and leave the beach as you find it either by taking your rubbish home with you or using the bins provided. We also ask people to respect the local community as access to the beach is situated within a residential area.”

Shop till you drop in fabulous Sefton

Sefton is booming with business and it’s easy to find a world of shopping wonders across our beautiful borough.

Whether it’s the hustle and bustle of South Road, the bargains of Bootle Strand, the boutiques of Lord Street, Formby’s Chapel Lane or Central Square in Maghull, Sefton is a huge shopping spree waiting to happen all year round.

So why not sample just some of our shopping delights during the sunny weekend?

If it’s sartorial elegance you’re after, be sure to check out the fantastic array of clothing retailers along Lord Street in Southport.

Or how about Wesley Street? Southport’s very own ‘Village In The Town.’

A microcosm of shopping, eating and entertaining delights, the colourful street is nestled away between Eastbank Street and Tulketh Street.

Awash with independent boutiques, barbers, cafes and shops, with a relaxed and friendly atmosphere, there is something for everyone.

 

In Formby, Chapel Lane is a haven for the relaxed shopper with an array of stores and restaurants to suit every need.

Book lovers will find a haven of literary wonders in Crosby Village with Pritchard’s Book shop on Moor Lane or if you’re feeling peckish, sample  foods of the world on South Road, Waterloo.

But if you’re a baragin hunter, Bootle Strand Shopping Centre is the place to be with a treasure trove of deals, sales and a vast array of stores and outlets to pick from.

For more suggestions and ideas on where to visit and what to see in Sefton, visit the council’s instagram @sefton_council.

Tails start wagging with interactive Good Dog Code posters

Tails will be wagging with the launch of a brand new smartphone campaign from Sefton Council Good Dogs Code.

The Sefton Good Dog Code has launched a series of QR codes which will be displayed across parks, beaches and main roads in Sefton to encourage good and responsible dog ownership in the borough.

The interactive smartphone adverts are simple to use. After taking a photo of the code on a phone camera, users are directed to the Sefton Good Dog Code website which details how dog owners can encourage others to be responsible for their pets.

Local residents and dog lovers have worked alongside Sefton in the creation of the Code, which tells residents to clean up after their pets, respect those who don’t like dogs, follow the rules and ensure their dog is socialized before it mingles with other dogs.

Steve Smith, Sefton Council’s Environmental Health & Trading Standards Manager said: “The code was jointly put together by ourselves and residents to promote responsible dog ownership.

“Along with the poster and flyers, we’ll now be placing QR codes around our parks, coastal areas and cemeteries which links to the online version of the Good Dog Code.

“There are plenty of ways you can be a responsible dog owner, from making sure you clean up after your pets to respecting none-dog lovers.

“Unfortunately some dog owners are not responsible and have no regard for their community. For these few, legislation is tough on them.

“Enforcement action such as fixed penalties and possible court action can be taken against these dog owners.”

Lyn Hilton the founder of local volunteer group ‘Sefton Dogs’ added: “What began as a campaign to ensure that our dogs could enjoy off lead experience at the beach and on our local nature reserves changed into a volunteer movement which aims for a friendly, informed and responsible approach to dog ownership in Sefton.”

Since July 2017, Sefton has had a Public Space Protection Order across the borough with informs dog owners about certain rules which must be followed.

For more information about these rules and to learn more about the Good Dog Code, visit www.sefton.gov.uk/thegooddogcode.

Saddle up and gallop into Sefton after the Grand National

Visitors to the Aintree Grand National Festival should bet on an odds-on favourite and enjoy all that beautiful Sefton has to offer!

Once the racing has ended for the day, thousands of festival-goers are set to saddle up and check out the mane attractions throughout the borough.

A spokesman for Sefton Council said: “Hear it from the horses’ mouth! Sefton is the place to be during the Aintree Festival weekend and we encourage all race-goers to explore our wonderful borough.

“From 22 miles of golden sands, the beauty of Formby’s National Trust pinewoods and the iconic Iron Men in Crosby, Sefton has it all.

“Visit Ainsdale and Birkdale beach to see the shores where Grand National hero Red Rum honed his skills then relax along Southport’s Lord Street shopping boulevard and the resort’s fine bars and restaurants.

“Take in the fascinating Vikings Legends exhibition at the Atkinson before a canter through Formby woods and dinner on Waterloo’s South Road to sample foods of the world.

“Finish off with a photo or two of our incredible Another Place – 100 spectacular cast-iron, life-size figures by Anthony Gormley spread across three miles of the foreshore and stretching almost one kilometre out to sea.

“Sefton is definitely the odds-on winner for a great day out.”

For more suggestions and ideas on where to visit and what to see in Sefton, visit the council’s instagram @sefton_council.

Appeal to find information on Sefton’s World War One heroines

Sefton’s Library Service are appealing for help to find information on nine local heroines of World War One.

As part of the Beyond The War Memorials Project, Sefton Libraries are creating a special tribute to the men and women who are honoured on war memorials across the borough.

Now the team behind the project are appealing to local historians, families and the wider community to find out more about the heroines who gave their lives for their country.

Andrew Farthing, Sefton Council’s Libraries Development Manager, said: “There are a number of women listed on Sefton’s civic war memorials but very little is known about them.

We want to highlight these brave ladies who gave their lives during World War One for the freedom from oppression that we enjoy today.

Throughout the Beyond The War Memorials project we’ve been compiling information and photos on our heroes and heroines but we need the public’s help in delving deeper into their background. Information and particularly photographs of these women have proved difficult to locate.

The information will go towards creating a massive online biography for most, if not all, the heroic Sefton residents who are listed on our Civic War Memorials.”

Anyone with any information about Sefton heroines of World War One is asked to email Lesley.davies@sefton.gov.uk or call 0151 934 4920.

The nine women found listed so far on Sefton’s Civic War Memorials are:

Southport
Munitions worker Mary Jane Gartside-Tipping joined the Women’s Emergency Canteens Service in 1917 and served on the Western Front. Four months into her service she was shot in the head and killed by a deranged French soldier. She was posthumously awarded the Croix De Guerre and buried with full military honours. 

Sister Janet Lois Griffiths volunteered for active service at the outbreak of WW1 and served in Alexandria, Egypt. She narrowly avoided being killed when a medical lorry she was travelling in collided with a train. Sadly during the rescue operation to save her fellow nurses, Janet was killed.

Ainsdale
Delamere Road resident Stella Rose Boue-Blandy (1896-1919). At the outbreak of war, Stella joined Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Nursing Service, serving in France, Egypt, and Palestine.

Seaforth & Waterloo
Stewardess Agnes B Hird of Woodland Road, Seaforth left behind two sons when, at the age of 40, she was presumed lost at sea with her ship, the SS Ava, having been sunk by Axis forces.

Waterloo resident Elizabeth Kennedy and Seaforth’s Florence Jones are also listed on the Waterloo memorial, however little is known about either heroine.

Bootle
Nurse May Wylie died at the age of 20 at a Military Hospital after serving faithfully with the Queen Mary Army Auxiliary Corps. She was given a military gun-carriage funeral at Anfield Cemetery.

Stewardesses Eleanor Dodwell and Christina Campbell-Rennie both served on the ill-fated RMS Lusitania which was sunk by a German U-boat in 1915. Both their names are also inscribed on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

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