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Mayor throws open doors to Bootle Town Hall

The Mayor of Sefton’s office are throwing open the doors of Bootle Town Hall next month for National Heritage Open Day.

Hour long tours of Bootle Town Hall will be available throughout Saturday September 9, forming one of over 5,000 events across England to reflect the rich and diverse cultural heritage of our communities.

Four tours will take place from 10:30am, 11:30am, 1.30pm and 2.30pm, showing off the Assembly Hall, Ballroom, Committee Room, Council Chamber and Mayor’s Parlours

Places on the tours can be booked via the Mayor of Sefton’s Office on 0151 934 2062, or by email mayorsoffice@sefton.gov.uk.

Litter warning for motorists after cab driver prosecution

Sefton Council is warning motorists that they are not above littering laws after a taxi driver was caught on dashcam footage throwing rubbish out of his window.

 Paul Morttram, 32, a Sefton licensed taxi driver, was found guilty in his absence of three counts of littering at a hearing at Sefton Magistrates Court on August 15.

 He now faces a fine of £300 and £333 in costs and victim surcharges after originally failing to pay a fixed-penalty-notice.

 Dashcam footage filmed by a concerned motorist on January 9 clearly showed Mr Morttram throwing rubbish out of his drivers’ window three times in the space of two minutes while travelling through Bootle.

 The footage was passed to Sefton Council’s Environmental Enforcement Team and, when interviewed, Mr Morttram admitted to the offences.

 He was issued with three separate fixed-penalty-notices, totalling £150 but after repeated failed attempts to contact the defendant, legal action was taken.

 Magistrates this week found in favour of Sefton Council and Mr Morttam was ordered to pay £633.

Cllr Paulette Lappin, Cabinet Member Regulatory, Compliance and Corporate Services, said:

“We are very pleased with the outcome and want people to realise no matter how big or small an item is, dropping litter is an offence and this applies to all members of the public, regardless of if you’re on the pavement or in a vehicle.

“The best way to avoid a fine or a court appearance is to not drop litter.

“Littering is consistently one of the main concerns raised by residents and the council spend over £3 million per year cleaning up litter.

“We pursue a vigorous enforcement approach by issuing fixed penalty notices and it is only by prosecuting individuals who don’t pay, that the council can present a robust enforcement deterrent.”

Intrepid volunteers aim high for Sefton 4 Good

A Sefton charity has been aiming high with its latest major fundraising project.

A team of 11 brave volunteers abseiled down the outside of the main entrance of Liverpool Cathedral and raised more than £1,000 for Sefton 4 Good.

Team members who took on the 150-foot free-fall drop in wet and windy conditions
included Sefton CVS, Sefton Council and members of the public.

Sefton 4 Good was established by Sefton CVS in 2013 to make it easier for borough
residents and businesses to support local good causes by giving their money, resources, time and skills.

Money raised is distributed via a grant scheme which is particularly aimed at smaller
organisations, or collaborative projects that include small groups.

Sefton’s Head of Commissioning Support & Business Intelligence Peter Moore along with Head of Regulation & Compliance Jill Coule, Daniel Longman and Adam Blackwel took it in turns to abseil down the iconic city cathedral.

Sefton 4 Good Co-ordinator, Mike Howlett, commented:

“This event was a completely new venture for us, so we’re very pleased at how it went and that so many people supported the team and helped us raise a very significant sum for our charity.

“We’re especially grateful to the intrepid volunteers who actually completed the abseil. This was always going to be a very daunting challenge for them, but it was made even more difficult by the far from ideal conditions on the day.”

Foragers find floral treats in the heart of Bootle

Members of the highly successful One Pot Meal club at Bootle library had a hands on lesson in foraging recently.

The group, led by the Fairland Collective and Sefton Libraries, took a break from cooking up a homemade minestrone soup, to set about foraging for natural table decorations in and around Stanley Road.

Bootle Library assistant Louisa Harrison was on hand to lead a team of intrepid explorers around Bootle to find decorative flowers and plants that could easily be crafted into a bespoke table decoration. 

The initiative has already inspired a number of residents to join the Bootle Library’s Human Library scheme.

Thanks to a grant of almost £100,000 from Arts Council England – a brand new project will aim to support adults living in Bootle through the creation of a ‘human library’ where people can ‘gift’ their talents or experience to someone in need.

The concept is based around a place where real people are on loan instead of books. They provide gifts that might range from preparing and hosting a community meal or one to one sessions with someone living with a mental health condition.

A series of creative programmes will aim to uncover local talents which, in turn, will build a sustainable bank of volunteers who can pass their ‘gift’ or experiences on.

Commissioner reopens fund to help communities prevent crime

Organisations which help to reduce crime and protect communities in Merseyside are being invited to apply for a share of a fund aimed at helping building stronger, safer communities.

This is the third year that Merseyside’s Police Commissioner Jane Kennedy has opened the Crime Prevention Fund which is used to help charities, community groups and social enterprises stop problems before they occur, by reducing the opportunities for crime and by deterring people away from becoming involved in anti-social and criminal behaviour.

A total of £135,000 is available from the fund and the Commissioner is inviting groups to submit bids of between £5,000 and £25,000 for innovative community safety projects or schemes that will be run between now and April 2018.

This year, the Commissioner is specifically urging organisations that are working to tackle the causes of serious and organised crime to apply for funding.

Jane said: “Serious and organised crime is, for many people, their greatest concern. It blights our communities, bringing misery and suffering and causing lasting harm.

“Merseyside Police allocates extensive resources to tackling this issue, but they cannot succeed alone. Local people understand their communities better than anyone and know what will work best to improve their area. We are fortunate to have a wealth of voluntary and community groups which are working hard to prevent people, especially young people from getting involved with this type of crime and I want to hear from them.

“Through the Crime Prevention Fund, I want to see what more can be done to tackle this issue and with these grants I hope I can give organisations which are trying to address the root causes of this issue a valuable cash boost which will help to make a difference to communities across Merseyside.”

Last year, 12 grassroots organisations were chosen to share £132,000 from the Crime Prevention Fund from a total of 116 bids submitted. Many of the projects focused on preventing young people from getting involved with crime.

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