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Next of Kin Appeal- Alexander Aitchison

Liverpool Coroner’s Office is appealing for the public’s help in tracing the next of kin of a man who recently passed away in Bootle.

Alexander Aitchison, aged 49, died on Tuesday, 26 September at his home address in Orrell Lane.

There are no suspicious circumstances surrounding Mr Aitchison’s death.

Any family members or people with information are asked to contact Coroners Officer Stephen Craig on 0151 777 3422 or email

Displaying foods hygiene rating must be made mandatory after brexit

Council environmental health teams score food outlets from zero to five based on factors such as kitchen cleanliness, cooking methods and food management.

Businesses in Wales and Northern Ireland are legally required to display their rating. However, in England, businesses do not have to display the rating they have been awarded, with those scoring low marks much less likely to put them on show to customers.

The LGA believes that businesses – including restaurants, pubs, cafes, takeaways, sandwich shops, supermarkets and delicatessens – that fail to comply should be fined or prosecuted.


Cllr Simon Blackburn, Chair of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said:

“The conversion of EU law as part of Brexit will impact on many council services that affect people’s day-to-day lives, including how to protect people from being served unsafe food.

“The post-Brexit review of EU laws gives the Government choices. We believe that food hygiene laws need to be strengthened, where necessary, with ‘Scores on the Doors’ ratings being a good area of opportunity to do this.

“With mandatory hygiene rating display already in force in Wales and Northern Ireland, the UK leaving the EU provides a crucial opportunity to toughen up food safety laws by extending the legislation to England as well. Food hygiene standards and compliance levels have risen since the scheme was introduced in Wales.

“The lack of a hygiene rating sticker in a business means customers are left in the dark on official kitchen cleanliness levels when eating or buying food there.

“A food hygiene rating distinguishes between appearance and reality. A food outlet may have nice décor but that doesn’t mean that hygiene standards are good enough to avoid being served a ‘dodgy’ burger or salad that could pose a serious risk to someone’s health.

“Councils have seen some shocking examples of poor or dangerous hygiene and always take action to improve standards at rogue food premises.

“Making the display of hygiene ratings compulsory in England is good for business. Not only would it incentivise food outlets to improve or maintain high hygiene standards – which would reduce the risk of illness for customers – it would also improve consumer confidence and save taxpayers’ money by reducing the need for, and cost of, enforcement action by councils.”


  • Horrified food inspectors at Enfield Council found a rat’s nests with live babies, cockroaches leaving flour in a dough mixer machine, and rat faeces and urine over food packaging materials during an inspection at a bakery. Following a prosecution by the council, the bakery and its owner were ordered to pay a total of £7,176 in fines and costs.


  • In a prosecution brought by Hillingdon Council, a West London fast food restaurant and its director were ordered to pay £19,518 after mouse droppings were found in the food preparation area, staff were not washing their hands before touching customers’ food and food was left in freezers that were not switched on. The restaurant had been given a zero food hygiene rating but had repeatedly ignored warnings to improve cleanliness standards.


  • A Merseyside restaurant was prosecuted by Sefton Council after health inspectors found dead flies in pans of bolognese, bird faeces in an extractor fan and out-of-date lasagne, and a large dead insect in a trifle. There was also no disinfectant product on the premises. The owner was fined £750.

  • Following a prosecution by Waltham Forest Council, the owner of a Chinese restaurant was banned from operating a business for life and ordered to pay £11,576 after it was found to be infested with cockroaches. Shelving that contained food was also contaminated with mice droppings and urine, and there was a foul odour of rotting food.


  • In a prosecution by Harrow Council, the owner of a vermin-infested fast food shop received a lifetime ban on running a food business and was ordered to pay £24,905 after food hygiene inspectors found rodent droppings all over the premises, including on rotting cucumbers and tomatoes, and in food storage, preparation and serving areas. The shop was so filthy that even its food safety guide was found covered in dirt on the floor.

In a separate prosecution by the council, the owner of a “cash and carry” was fined £4,550 after bite marks, excrement and urine was found on chocolate bars on sale due to a rat infestation.

  • The owners of an Essex pub and one of its directors were ordered to pay a total of £43,358 after rats were found nesting under the fridge in its kitchen, following a prosecution by Chelmsford City Council. The pub was shut down and one of the directors banned indefinitely from managing any food business.

·         The owner of a kebab takeaway was ordered to pay £3,550 at court after officers at South Oxfordshire District Council found that a food storage building was infested by rats and covered in dirt and rat droppings.

Fire crews issue advice following suspected Crosby arson

Merseyside Fire & Rescue Service (MFRS) and Merseyside Police are joining forces to tackle the issue of garden fires after a series of suspected arson incidents in the Rimrose Valley area of Crosby during the past week. The incidents have included trees, bushes and rubbish being set alight in gardens and on open land.

Officers from the fire service will be carrying out proactive mobile patrols, supported by local police officers, and residents are being asked to check and clear any rubbish from gardens to ensure that their houses are at a minimal risk of being targeted.

Station Manager Paul Kay, Arson Reduction Co-ordinator for Merseyside Fire & Rescue Service, said: “Merseyside Fire & Rescue Service is committed to tackling incidents of suspected arson and is working closely with officers from Merseyside Police to tackle anti-social fire setting in Crosby.

“There have been a number of suspected arson incidents in the area recently and tonight will see firefighters and police officers work together to reassure residents, raise awareness of the dangers of arson and highlight the impact fires have on our communities.

“Arson is a serious criminal offence which puts people’s lives at risk, causes damage to homes, businesses and community facilities and impacts on wildlife and the environment.

“It can range from mindless criminal damage to deliberately-targeted attacks but, either way, the potentially deadly consequences remain the same.

“If fire engines are called out to deliberate fires this may delay our response to other emergencies, which could endanger lives elsewhere. We want to make people aware that deliberately setting fires in a public place is arson and, if caught, those responsible may face legal action.

“To help protect their properties from arson, residents are encouraged to put their wheelie bins away until the day they are being collected and avoid placing bins, rubbish, or other combustible items against the walls of their home. Sheds and garages should be securely locked and any flammable liquids safely stored away.

Merseyside Police Local Community Sergeant Kate Young said: “I want to reassure people in the local community that we standing alongside the fire service in taking any suspected arson incident extremely seriously, as the consequences of such reckless and behaviour can be catastrophic.

“If you are aware of any suspicious behaviour near to your home, call 999 and the emergency services can respond accordingly. Anyone with home CCTV or passing motorists with dash-cam footage of in recent incidents are also encouraged to speak to us. We will act on all information provided and are determined to identify those responsible and bring them to justice.

“We will be parking a mobile police station in the Rimrose Valley area tonight and would encourage anyone to speak with us to report incidents or concerns. If you know who is responsible for these incidents do the right thing and call police or speak to us anonymously via the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.”

Senior Road Users Event Heads To Formby

Sefton Council is holding a road users event offering support and advice for those over the age of 60 and places are still available.

The Sefton Senior Road User’s Event, led by the Council’s Highway Safety Team, aims to ensure that road users get the best advice and support they need to keep themselves and others safe on the borough’s roads.

A range of speakers from groups including Merseyside Police, Merseyside Fire and Rescue and Arriva will be at the event at the Gild Hall in Formby on Thursday, September 14 from 10am-2pm.

Previous events held across the borough have proved to be very popular and well attended.

Refreshments, including lunch, are provided  and as places are limited, to book a place for you or a family member, call 0151 934 4259 or email

How to get in and out of Liverpool during Lime Street’s major upgrade 30 September – 22 October

Travellers are being reassured that the Liverpool City Region will remain ‘open for business’ when the first phase of a major transformation of Liverpool Lime Street kicks off next month (30 September – 22 October). This is the biggest upgrade the station has seen since the 19th Century.

The plan is to keep people on trains wherever possible, including diverting many mainline rail services to Liverpool South Parkway and getting people to and from the city on the Merseyrail network. Where rail replacement buses are required they will be high quality and will offer both express/limited stop and stopping services.

The Lime Street upgrade is one of 10 major railway upgrades as part of a £340m railway investment in the Liverpool City Region, and sits within the wider Great North Rail Project to transform rail travel for customers in the north of England.

Once complete in 2018, the work will enable an extra three services per hour in and out of Lime Street station, including new direct services to Scotland. Longer, better managed platforms will allow bigger trains, with more space for passengers, in and out of the station.

For the first nine days of the closure, engineers will also be working to complete the installation of the fourth track between Huyton and Roby. This will allow faster no-stop intercity services to overtake local stopping services along this route.

Key travel advice

  • The Liverpool City Region remains open for business. You will still be able to get where you want to go, but you will need to make some small changes to your journey.
  • Please plan ahead and allow extra time for your journey. Estimated additional travel times will be provided, where possible, to help you plan.
  • Based on your final destination, the alternative travel arrangements may actually get you closer to where you need to be.
  • Stick to public transport where possible to keep the city moving. If you live within the Liverpool City Region, commercial bus services may also offer a good alternative travel option.
  • There will be additional staff on hand at key interchanges to help you get where you need to be.
  • Please print/pick up pre-paid tickets before the day of travel.
  • Employers and staff should consider what the impacts may be on working patterns and consider adjustments if necessary, such as the potential for flexible working, starting and finishing later and the opportunity for home working.

Over the 23 days, engineers will be remodelling station platforms, increasing them in number and in length. Work will also take place to install overhead line equipment to power electric trains and upgrade track.

This is the first of two phases of work at Liverpool Lime Street, with a further station closure planned in summer 2018. Key travel details are below, but to find out more visit Find out more: 

 ***Key detail***

 Journeys via Liverpool South Parkway

Mainline services from destinations such as Manchester, London, Birmingham, Leeds, York and Crewe will start/terminate at Liverpool South Parkway, with the Merseyrail network taking passengers to/from Moorfields station in Liverpool City Centre.

Tickets will be valid on the Merseyrail network during the work so there is no need to purchase a separate ticket.

It is estimated that transferring onto the Merseyrail network should add only 10-15 minutes to your journey. There will be 4 trains per hour, Monday to Saturday, and 2-4 trains per hour on Sundays (depending on the time of travel).

Journeys via Hunts Cross

Services via stations between Warrington and Hunts Cross will start/terminate at Hunts Cross station. Passengers can choose between a quality express rail replacement bus service, non-stop between Hunts Cross and Moorfields station in the Liverpool City Centre or a stopping service calling at stations on the City Line (Liverpool South Parkway, West Allerton, Mossley Hill and Edge Hill) to/from Liverpool Lime Street.

The express rail replacement bus service will run every 15 minutes, Monday to Saturday, and every 30 minutes on Sunday. This will add, approximately, up to 18 minutes onto journeys (based on peak-time travel).

Stopping rail replacement bus services between Hunts Cross and Liverpool Lime Street will run every 30 minutes, Monday to Saturday, and every hour on Sunday. This will add, approximately, up to 22 minutes onto journeys.

 Journeys via St Helens/Huyton

Between 30 September and 8 October, services between Manchester Victoria, Wigan, the Lakes, Scotland, Blackpool and Preston will start/terminate at St Helens Central or St Helens Junction. Quality rail replacement bus services will offer an express/limited stop service and a stopping service calling at all stations on both routes.

Express/limited stop services (calling at St Helens Central, Huyton and Liverpool Lime Street or St Helens Junction, Lea Green, Huyton, Wavertree Tech Park and Liverpool Lime Street) will run hourly on Monday to Saturday. Stopping services, calling at all stations, will run every 30 minutes, Monday to Saturday, and every hour on Sunday.

From 9 October until 20 October, limited rail services will run in and out of Liverpool Lime Street between 6am and 8pm. For services before 6am and after 8pm, quality rail replacement bus services will run between Huyton and Liverpool Lime Street.

On the final two days, 21 – 22 October, services will start/terminate at Huyton station with quality rail replacement bus services on hand to get you to/from Liverpool Lime Street. On Saturday they will run every 15 minutes and on Sunday every 30 minutes.

The rail replacement bus service calling at all stations between St Helens and Liverpool Lime Street will add, approximately, up to 60 minutes to your journey. Those travelling on the express/limited stop service will need to add approximately 35 minutes to their journey. From Huyton station, rail replacement bus services will add approximately up to 28 minutes to journeys (all based on peak-time travel).

Weekend work on the Ordsall Chord in Greater Manchester from now until 23 October will also mean there will be some changes to services in and out of Manchester Victoria. Passengers are advised to check before they travel.

For more information on the schemes that make up the £340m rail investment in the Liverpool City Region by the end of 2019 visit

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