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Remembrance Day Services take place across Sefton

The Mayor of Sefton, councillors and council officers will all attend Remembrance Day services taking place across the borough.

They will all remember those who died in conflict at services being held on Sunday, November 12.

The Mayor of Sefton, Cllr Dave Robinson, will attend a morning service at the War Memorial, King’s Gardens, Bootle at 10.55am and an afternoon service at Holy Trinity Church, Formby at 3pm.

Councillors and other Sefton Council representatives will be present at a total of 11 services being held on Sunday, November 12 throughout the borough.

These will be held at other locations in Aintree, Ainsdale, Crosby, Hightown, Ince Blundell, Litherland, Maghull, Southport and Waterloo. Cllr Ian Maher, Sefton Council’s Labour leader will be at the service at the War Memorial, Lord Street, Southport starting at 10.55am.

In previous years the number of members of the public attending the services has increased and people are advised to arrive in plenty of time.

Mayor of Sefton, Cllr Dave Robinson, said:

“Without fail every year councillors, council officers, members of the public and our armed forces are rightfully present at the many services taking place across the borough.

“As the Mayor of Sefton I am very proud to attend them and I hope as many people as possible will attend the services held in Sefton on this very important date.

“It gives us the opportunity to spend some time to pause and reflect on the sacrifices made by our brave service men and women over the years in various conflicts.”

Cllr Bobby Brennan, Sefton Council’s Armed Forces champion, added:

“All the services taking place in Sefton and across the country are very important as we remember those who lost their lives in conflict past and present.

“They give us a chance for us all to remember how we owe a huge debt to every single one of them for the peace and freedom we currently enjoy today. As we pause to remember the fallen we are mindful of our serving men and women as they carry out their duties both at home and overseas.”

District Location Assembly Time Service Time Mayor/Mayor’s Representative
Aintree Junction of Brickwall Lane/Lunt Road/Bridges Lane, Opposite Sefton Parish Church, Sefton Village, L29 10.30 a.m. 10.45 a.m. Cllr John Sayers
Ainsdale War Memorial Village Green 10.30 a.m. 10.45 a.m. Cllr Lynne Thompson
Bootle War Memorial
King’s Gardens, Stanley Road
10.25 a.m. 10.57 a.m. Mayor of Sefton – Cllr Dave Robinson
Waterloo War Memorial Five
Lamps, Gt George’s Road
10.30 a.m. 10.57 a.m. Cllr Paul Cummins
Crosby War Memorial Garden
Alexandra Park, Coronation Road
10.30 a.m. 10.57 a.m. Cllr Les Byrom
Formby Holy Trinity Church
Rosemary Lane, Formby
2.50 p.m. 3.00 p.m. Mayor of Sefton – Cllr Dave Robinson
Hightown War Memorial
St Stephens Road, Hightown
10.35 a.m. 10.45 a.m. Cllr Steve McGinnity
Ince Blundell War Memorial
Lady Green Lane, Ince Blundell
12.05 p.m. 12.15 p.m. Cllr Catie Page
Litherland War Memorial
Town Hall, Sefton Road
10.30 a.m. 10.40 a.m. Cllr Ian Moncur
Maghull St Andrew’s Church
Damfield Lane
9.50 a.m. 10.00 a.m. Cllr Marion Atkinson
Southport War Memorial
Monument Square, Lord Street
10.25 a.m. 10.57 a.m. Cllr Ian Maher
(Leader of the Council)

The Atkinson in Southport 

Join us for an important series of talks and films that showcase Maghull and the Great War Remembered: Shell Shock –the impact and aftermath an ongoing project exploring the ground-breaking treatment of shell shock at Moss Side hospital during the First World War.  Explore Sefton’s First World War heritage through an exhibition of banners and you can do your own research as well as talk to our Volunteer researchers.

Supported by historians from Manchester Metropolitan University, archives consultant Kevin Bolton and staff from our Museum together with local volunteers from throughout Merseyside will be delivering a day of talks, presentations and activities focused on the pioneering wartime work, and post-war legacy, of the now disappeared Moss Side Military Hospital.

Programme of Events

11am  – Two Minute Silence followed by Maghull Parish Handbell Ringers
11.15am – Welcome to Sefton Remembers
11.30am – Moss Side Hospital, Shell Shock & the Community. Kevin Bolton, Archives Consultant
12.15pm Not Forgotten, Shell Shock & the Centennial of the First World War. Dr Sam Edwards, Manchester Metropolitan University
1pm – Remembering Moss Side. Bill Esterson MP & Cllr June Burns, Mayor of Maghull
1.15pm – Veterans in Sefton: the work we do & the help we provide
Steve Calderbank, former Chief Petty Officer (Navy), & Dave Smith, former Sergeant Major (Army),
Founders of Veterans in Sefton.
2pm – Research stories. Adam Cree, Volunteer

Adoption Appeal for Sefton Siblings

64% of the children in the North West who are waiting for adoptive families are brothers and sisters in groups of 2 or more according to new information published to mark National Adoption Week (October  16-22). 
Based on the latest Government information, and figures from national adoption information service, First4Adoption, it shows that sibling groups wait longer than single children to be placed with a ‘forever family’. 


Cllr John Joseph Kelly, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Children, Schools and Safeguarding, said: “As in previous years, the need to find families for some of our most vulnerable children remains at the heart of this year’s campaign. 

“We’re asking anyone who may be considering adoption to think about whether they could parent siblings?

“There’s no denying that having more than one child comes with real challenges but it also has advantages and brings great rewards. If you’re interested in finding out more, please contact Sefton Adoption Service today.”

 

The new research, by Adoption Match and based on data from the Adoption Register for England also reveals that:

  • 52% of sibling groups awaiting adoption in the North West are children aged over 4
  • 59% of these groups awaiting adoption are made up of boys
  • 11% of the siblings groups awaiting adoption are Black and Minority Ethnic children

 

Elaine Jamieson from Sefton Council’s Adoption Service, added: “The majority of people adopting for the first time choose to take a single child into their family. 

“Also, it is often in the best interests of the children that a sibling group finds a family together rather than experience further trauma by being separated. 

“This presents an extra challenge for social workers and these factors account for the high proportion of siblings in our region waiting for an adoptive family.”

Sefton adopters, Chris and Julie, said: “Adoption has meant we’ve got the family we’ve always wanted, perhaps slightly less conventionally then some people do it but we’re proud to have a part in shaping their world.

“When our girls were placed with us it was exciting and bewildering but you just take a leap of faith! The moment they called us mum and dad meant everything to us.” 



The regional adoption agency, Adopting In Merseyside (AIM), covering Liverpool, Sefton, Knowsley and Wirral are holding an information evening on October 18. For more information on adoption or to register for the event, contact Sefton Adoption Service on Freephone 0800 923 2777 or visit seftonadoption.co.uk 

Bootle Stories in The Strand

A shop in The Strand shopping centre will be transformed to chart Bootle’s past and look to the town’s future.

The former Blue Inc unit in the Sefton Council owned shopping centre will become a pop-up history event as well as hosting information about the proposed Bootle Town Hall Heritage and Cultural Centre consultation.

The unit will be open during the school half term holidays (October 23-28) and November 6-11 from 10am-4pm. There will be a range of activities in the unit, including exhibitions and objects, relating to local history.

Visitors will be able to take part in a consultation about the town as Sefton Council explores opportunities to create a cultural and heritage facility within Bootle Town Hall complex of Grade II listed buildings.

In October 2016, Sefton Council published the Bootle Town Centre Investment Framework – a high level strategic document which looked to harness Bootle’s current assets and help reshape the town into a desirable residential, educational and business location.

Feedback gained from the Investment Framework highlighted the Bootle Town Hall complex as a great regeneration opportunity with the desire for increased cultural activity a key theme.

Now a consultation and engagement exercise is underway looking at the potential to create a new cultural and heritage facility in the former Bootle Free Library and Museum within the town hall complex. Other civic functions within the town hall would still be maintained.


Cllr Ian Maher, Sefton Council’s Labour leader, said: “The event in the Strand will give people a chance to look back at Bootle’s history and also give them a chance to get involved in the consultation which looks to the future.

“By transforming Bootle Town Hall into a new home of arts and culture, we believe this would be a major statement of the Council’s ambition for the town.

“Potentially this refreshed physical space will be supported by a learning and skills infrastructure, reaching out to the local community and developing materials that can be used in local schools, adult education centres and beyond.

“We believe this project will help ensure the town hall remains the civic focus of Bootle and also deliver a new cultural offer that will be sustainable and manageable over the long term.

“Please pop down to The Strand in the coming weeks and take a look at the unit and give us your views about the amazing town hall complex.”



To get involved in the consultation visit sefton.gov.uk and click on the ‘take part in a consultation’ tab.

Next of Kin Appeal- Alexander Aitchison

Liverpool Coroner’s Office is appealing for the public’s help in tracing the next of kin of a man who recently passed away in Bootle.

Alexander Aitchison, aged 49, died on Tuesday, 26 September at his home address in Orrell Lane.

There are no suspicious circumstances surrounding Mr Aitchison’s death.

Any family members or people with information are asked to contact Coroners Officer Stephen Craig on 0151 777 3422 or email
Sefton.Coroners.Office@merseyside.pnn.police.uk.

Displaying foods hygiene rating must be made mandatory after brexit

Council environmental health teams score food outlets from zero to five based on factors such as kitchen cleanliness, cooking methods and food management.

Businesses in Wales and Northern Ireland are legally required to display their rating. However, in England, businesses do not have to display the rating they have been awarded, with those scoring low marks much less likely to put them on show to customers.

The LGA believes that businesses – including restaurants, pubs, cafes, takeaways, sandwich shops, supermarkets and delicatessens – that fail to comply should be fined or prosecuted.

 

Cllr Simon Blackburn, Chair of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said:

“The conversion of EU law as part of Brexit will impact on many council services that affect people’s day-to-day lives, including how to protect people from being served unsafe food.

“The post-Brexit review of EU laws gives the Government choices. We believe that food hygiene laws need to be strengthened, where necessary, with ‘Scores on the Doors’ ratings being a good area of opportunity to do this.

“With mandatory hygiene rating display already in force in Wales and Northern Ireland, the UK leaving the EU provides a crucial opportunity to toughen up food safety laws by extending the legislation to England as well. Food hygiene standards and compliance levels have risen since the scheme was introduced in Wales.

“The lack of a hygiene rating sticker in a business means customers are left in the dark on official kitchen cleanliness levels when eating or buying food there.

“A food hygiene rating distinguishes between appearance and reality. A food outlet may have nice décor but that doesn’t mean that hygiene standards are good enough to avoid being served a ‘dodgy’ burger or salad that could pose a serious risk to someone’s health.

“Councils have seen some shocking examples of poor or dangerous hygiene and always take action to improve standards at rogue food premises.

“Making the display of hygiene ratings compulsory in England is good for business. Not only would it incentivise food outlets to improve or maintain high hygiene standards – which would reduce the risk of illness for customers – it would also improve consumer confidence and save taxpayers’ money by reducing the need for, and cost of, enforcement action by councils.”

 

  • Horrified food inspectors at Enfield Council found a rat’s nests with live babies, cockroaches leaving flour in a dough mixer machine, and rat faeces and urine over food packaging materials during an inspection at a bakery. Following a prosecution by the council, the bakery and its owner were ordered to pay a total of £7,176 in fines and costs.

 

  • In a prosecution brought by Hillingdon Council, a West London fast food restaurant and its director were ordered to pay £19,518 after mouse droppings were found in the food preparation area, staff were not washing their hands before touching customers’ food and food was left in freezers that were not switched on. The restaurant had been given a zero food hygiene rating but had repeatedly ignored warnings to improve cleanliness standards.

 

  • A Merseyside restaurant was prosecuted by Sefton Council after health inspectors found dead flies in pans of bolognese, bird faeces in an extractor fan and out-of-date lasagne, and a large dead insect in a trifle. There was also no disinfectant product on the premises. The owner was fined £750.

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/restaurant-inspection-uncovers-dead-flies-12845128

  • Following a prosecution by Waltham Forest Council, the owner of a Chinese restaurant was banned from operating a business for life and ordered to pay £11,576 after it was found to be infested with cockroaches. Shelving that contained food was also contaminated with mice droppings and urine, and there was a foul odour of rotting food.

 

  • In a prosecution by Harrow Council, the owner of a vermin-infested fast food shop received a lifetime ban on running a food business and was ordered to pay £24,905 after food hygiene inspectors found rodent droppings all over the premises, including on rotting cucumbers and tomatoes, and in food storage, preparation and serving areas. The shop was so filthy that even its food safety guide was found covered in dirt on the floor.

In a separate prosecution by the council, the owner of a “cash and carry” was fined £4,550 after bite marks, excrement and urine was found on chocolate bars on sale due to a rat infestation.

  • The owners of an Essex pub and one of its directors were ordered to pay a total of £43,358 after rats were found nesting under the fridge in its kitchen, following a prosecution by Chelmsford City Council. The pub was shut down and one of the directors banned indefinitely from managing any food business.

·         The owner of a kebab takeaway was ordered to pay £3,550 at court after officers at South Oxfordshire District Council found that a food storage building was infested by rats and covered in dirt and rat droppings.

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